Submit to Facebook
Submit to Twitter

Detailed Program

21 October

Opening Ceremony: the Ocean Opus

marseille pharo vieux port vue aerienne ville_de_marseilleAerial view of Pharo Palace and the Old Port. © Ville de Marseille

The Opening Ceremony is focused on the notion of oceankind, which throughout the congress will guide participants’ exchanges on marine protected areas.

Oceankind may be defined as the state society will achieve when it becomes aware of the link that binds each person to the oceans’ future, wherever they may live.

Starting on Mediterranean shores and gradually opening onto distant horizons, the program graphically illustrates the core issue at stake: convincing nations that they must assume common responsibility for the future of the oceans, while taking into account the needs of society.

The ceremony combines live performances, keynotes and film screenings, for an inspirational and culturally diverse moment. It ends with a musical note that reflects the spirit of the Mediterranean.

Detailed Program

Congress book

 

3:00 PM - 4:15 PM - First Part: Welcome to the Mediterranean

For its first European edition, IMPAC is organized on Mediterranean shores, cradle of civilizations, to better underline the contribution the sea has made to human activities, and the interconnections between natural and human heritages.

 

4:15 PM - 6:00 PM - Second Part: Marine Protected Areas, a Visa for Oceankind

After considering the link between human beings and the oceans, major witnesses – men and women active on the field – remind us of the key role marine protected areas played in their own commitment to conservation.

 

6:30 PM - 8:30 PM - Inaugural Evening

The first day of the congress will end on rhythms mixing oriental and occidental influences to celebrate the musical diversity of the Mediterranean with Heejaz and Mohamed Abozekry, a famous oud player.

 
 
22 October

Science and Knowledge in the Service of Effective Management

Strategies for setting up or managing MPAs should be based on the best available knowledge. Day 2 offers an overview of, and opportunities to exchange on, the main scientific developments of the last few years. It also focuses on how the scientific community interacts on knowledge issues with managers, economic players and the larger public. This leads to a discussion of experiences in leveraging science for enhanced management, decision-making or public awareness.

 Program Day 2 (PDF) 

WS Codes beginning with WS are Workshops.
KC Codes beginning with KC are Knowledge Cafés.
PA Codes beginning with PA are Ocean+ Pavilion Presentations.

This Program is subject to last-minute changes.

 

PLENARY SESSIONS

Introductive plenary session (PL21) (8:45 AM - 9:45 AM) - AUDITORIUM

Moderators:
Patricio BERNAL, IUCN ; François GAUTHIEZ, AAMP
Speakers:

Denis ODY, WWF-France ; Mahé CHARLES, Agence des aires marines protégées ; David OBURA, CORDIO East Africa ; Philip WEAVER, Seascap Consultants ; Anne MCDONALD, Sophia University, Japan ; Grant GARDNER, Canadian Wildlife Federation

 

Midday Plenary debate (PL22) (2:30 PM - 3:00 PM) - AUDITORIUM

Moderators:
Carl Gustaf LUNDIN, International Union for Conservation of Nature
Speakers:

Silvia REVENGA MARTINEZ DE PAZOS, Spanish Secretariate for Fisheries, Fisheries Protection ; Philippe BOUCHET, Museum national d'Histoire naturelle

MPA knowledge – making MPAs work

 

 

Conclusive plenary session (PL23) (5:00 PM - 6:00 PM) - AUDITORIUM

Moderators:
Patricio BERNAL, IUCN ; François GAUTHIEZ, AAMP
Speakers:

Jihyun LEE, Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity ; Xavier PASTOR, Océana ; Lyle GLOWKA, Convention on Migratory Species ; Charles EHLER, UNESCO ; Gilles BOEUF, Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services, Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle

 
 
Streams Areas and Sessions (Workshops and Knowledge Cafés)
Conservation science in support of MPAs
Roles and effects of MPAs

Ecopath (KC2A1)

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM ; EUGENIE

Contributors: Didier GASCUEL, Agrocampus-Rennes ; Raymond LAë, Institute of Research for Development (IRD), Marine Environmental Sciences Laboratory (LEMAR)

Using the Ecopath model to assess the effects of MPAs.

Blue Carbon (WS2A1)

3:15 PM - 4:45 PM ; JOLIETTE

Contributors: Patricio BERNAL, IUCN ; Alain PIBOT, Agence des aires marines protégées ; Christian NEUMANN, GRID-Arendal

Objectives of the workshop: All studies confirmed day after day the fundamental role of the ocean in the global carbon cycle, and the special role of three habitats in carbon sequestration. It is so important to consider the appropriate role of marine protected areas , and IMPAC3 convention for the protection of these marine habitats.
Nearly Salt
marshes, Seagrasses and mangroves as coastal habitats are under strong influence of coastal uses, but also primary targets of management approaches and protection.

During this workshop , it is proposed to exchange to establish a shared doctrine and build steps or tools to enable it to help the community and especially managers, to protect key habitats of our future balances.

Questions:
- What should we learn from the carbon sequestration in the ocean environment and the development of three key habitats: critical analysis of numerous publications
- How to get the message from the major political movements, major international bodies
- What is the relevance and adequacy of the MPA network in terms of three key habitats : the example of the Mediterranean seagrass
- What position taken with regard to the mechanisms of carbon offset, such a mechanism would allow many countries to institute protection policies .
- Opportunity to engage in a great overall protection program accredited

Resilience : Current models, tools and indicators - Part 1 (WS2A2A)

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM ; LACYDON

Chairpersons: David OBURA, CORDIO East Africa ; John PRESCOTT, Vermont Law School
 
Contributors: Steven SCHILL, The Nature Conservancy - Caribbean Program ; Ameer ABDULLA, IUCN ; Petra MACGOWAN, The Nature Conservancy ; Mark LADD, Florida International University ; Philip RENAUD, Living Oceans Foundation

This workshop will be run in two parts, going from present/immediate issues “Part 1 – Current models, tools and indicators (WS2A2A)” to future issues “Part 2 – Future issues, new goals and bigger picture planning (WS2A2B)”. In the first part, presenters and discussion will focus on what resilience factors and measurements should be implemented to ensure ecological sustainability, and how managers can successfully implement these resilience indicators into established MPA regimes. In the second part, presenters and discussion will consider broader and novel issues - do current resilience indicators and measurements accurately account for the projected ecological and social needs given such factors as climate change?  If not, what needs to be included?  What policy issues affect current and future resilience? What needs to be put in place to scale up from current practices in resilience-based management to service the needs for regional-scale networks of MPAs?

 

The outcome of this 3 hour session will include a compiled list of resilience programmes and their key indicators, representing a body of practice that can be used by managers to establish both ecologically and socially resilient MPAs.  We also hope to establish the groundwork for which indicators to use in establishing future MPAs that address the impacts of climate change on species adaptation and social resilience. We will also develop guidance on scaling up resilience based management from MPAs to larger networks and management areas. Throughout the workshop we will also be addressing key players (e.g. managers, policy makers, and community leaders) who need to be involved in making current and future resilient MPAs a reality.  Finally, we will address the current policies regarding MPA management and what needs to be changed/proposed to ensure these resilience indicators are accurately accounted for.  

Resilience : Future issues, new goals and bigger picture planning - Part 2 (WS2A2B)

11:45 AM - 1:15 PM ; LACYDON

Chairpersons: David OBURA, CORDIO East Africa ; John PRESCOTT, Vermont Law School
 
Contributors: Petra MACGOWAN, The Nature Conservancy ; Bret WOLFE, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service ; Mark LADD, Florida International University ; Philip RENAUD, Living Oceans Foundation ; Steve SCHILL, The Nature Conservancy ; Ameer ABDULLA, International Union for Conservation of Nature

This workshop will be run in two parts, going from present/immediate issues “Part 1 – Current models, tools and indicators (WS2A2A)” to future issues “Part 2 – Future issues, new goals and bigger picture planning (WS2A2B)”. In the first part, presenters and discussion will focus on what resilience factors and measurements should be implemented to ensure ecological sustainability, and how managers can successfully implement these resilience indicators into established MPA regimes. In the second part, presenters and discussion will consider broader and novel issues - do current resilience indicators and measurements accurately account for the projected ecological and social needs given such factors as climate change?  If not, what needs to be included?  What policy issues affect current and future resilience? What needs to be put in place to scale up from current practices in resilience-based management to service the needs for regional-scale networks of MPAs?

 

The outcome of this 3 hour session will include a compiled list of resilience programmes and their key indicators, representing a body of practice that can be used by managers to establish both ecologically and socially resilient MPAs.  We also hope to establish the groundwork for which indicators to use in establishing future MPAs that address the impacts of climate change on species adaptation and social resilience. We will also develop guidance on scaling up resilience based management from MPAs to larger networks and management areas. Throughout the workshop we will also be addressing key players (e.g. managers, policy makers, and community leaders) who need to be involved in making current and future resilient MPAs a reality.  Finally, we will address the current policies regarding MPA management and what needs to be changed/proposed to ensure these resilience indicators are accurately accounted for.  

Understanding the effects of MPAs on biodiversity and ecosystems (WS2A4)

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM ; GRAND LARGE

Chairpersons: Cristina LINARES, Universitat Barcelona ; Bernat HEREU, University of Barcelona
 
Contributors: Raquel GOñI, Instituto Español de Oceanografia ; Nathalie CADOT, FIBA: Fondation Internationale du Banc d'Arguin ; Nicolas STURARO, Laboratory of Oceanology, MARE Centre, University of Liege ; Annabelle AISH, Service du Patrimoine Naturel, Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle

In this workshop we will analyze the importance of spatial and temporal scales and the different ecological traits and life strategies of species and communities in the effectiveness of MPAs. For this, several case studies of species with different ecological traits (such as mobility, life stages and sizes) and life strategies (dynamics, structure) and communities, will be presented and discussed comparatively between participants, focusing on the importance of spatial and temporal scales in their conservation under a MPA protection. Moreover, the species selection, techniques and analysis for monitoring these patterns will be also discussed.

Few examples in the literature of species or habitats long-term monitoring teach us that not all species and communities are equal and need different scales for their protection. The objective of this workshop is to identify some general patterns in determining the importance of time and spatial scale on different species and communities on the effectiveness of MPAs, and how these patterns can be monitored.

 

For this discussion, first, a brief presentation (5 minutes) of each participant, explaining his specie/habitat example focusing on the main topic of this workshop will introduce to the thematic, and after, the whole participants will participate in a general discussion to achieve the general objectives.

To organize the discussion, we will center the participations in the following questions:

 - Which spatial and temporal scales are relevant for MPAs being effective?

 - How important are the species life history and community’s structure and dynamics on the effectiveness of MPA?

 - Choice of indicator species and techniques for MPA monitoring including all species and strategies and scales 

Biodiversity studies

Taxonomy (KC2B2)

11:45 AM - 1:15 PM ; EUGENIE

Contributors: François GUILHAUMON, IRD - UMR 5119 ECOSYM

Learning to represent taxonomic, phylogenetic and functional diversity within MPAs, based on Mediterranean examples.

Studying species in MPAs: benthic species and habitats (WS2B2)

3:15 PM - 4:45 PM ; ESTAQUE

Chairpersons: Patrice FRANCOUR, Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis Laboratoire ECOMERS ; Bernat HEREU, University of Barcelona
 
Contributors: Sergio TRIGOS, Institut océanographique Paul Ricard ; Charles EGRETAUD, IFRECOR ; FABRIZIO GIANNI, Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis ; Catherine SEYTRE, Université Nice sophia Antipolis

In this workshop we will analyze the effectiveness of the MPA on the conservation of the whole benthic biodiversity inside and outside their boundaries. For this, we will analyze several examples of distinct habitats and species (commercial fish species, coralline lagoon, Mediterranean marine forests, sea urchins and bivalves) which have very different characteristics in terms of life history, structure and dynamics, and consequently have very different responses to perturbations and thus, to protection. This general question will allow us to discuss distinct topics that involve this topic such as which characteristics (in terms of size, time scale, human uses, level of protection etc.) are needed for MPA to be effective for all species and habitats, which are the best species or habitats indicators for the whole ecosystem diagnosis, or which are the best methods to study these species or communities.

The objective of this workshop is to achieve some general patterns in determining which type or groups of species or habitats have similar characteristics and responses to protection, and how these species or habitats should be monitored to diagnose the effectiveness of MPAs for conservation of the whole benthic biodiversity. 

To organize the discussion, we will center the participations in the following questions:

- Are MPA effective for all benthic species and habitats?

- Do effective MPA can protect species/habitats outside their borders ?

- Which requirements (in terms of size, time scale, human uses, level of protection etc.) are needed to be MPA effective for all species/habitats?

-Which are the best species/habitats indicators for the whole ecosystem diagnosis?

-Which are the best methods to study those species/habitats?

Understanding connectivity for MPA planning (WS2B3)

3:15 PM - 4:45 PM ; LA MAJOR

Chairpersons: Serge PLANES, USR 3278 CNRS-EPHE CRIOBE ; Estelle CROCHELET, IRD
 

Understanding larval connectivity patterns is a critical component of marine spatial planning, more particularly for the design of marine protected areas (MPA) and for fisheries management. The key question managers and users want an answer when deciding on an MPA, is where (i.e. who) the benefit will end up. If we can answer this question and even better show some local benefit to local management, then an MPA is much more likely to gain acceptance and thus be effective. For marine fisheries, the question of who benefits is perhaps most acute and difficult to answer because although the harvested life stage is relatively sedentary, adults typically produce pelagic larvae that have the potential to disperse far. But we know very little about actual patterns of larval fish dispersal and nothing about large fishery species, so whether local management results in local recruitment benefits is unknown. Recent field data and progress on modelling provide new perspective to implement connectivity on future plan. 

Establishing and managing MPAs at ocean scales
Ocean-scale approaches

"Filling the gap" in the World Heritage List (WS2C1)

3:15 PM - 4:45 PM ; LACYDON

Chairpersons: Dan LAFFOLEY, WCPA Marine
 
Contributors: Josephine LANGLEY, International Union for Conservation of Nature ; David OBURA, CORDIO East Africa ; Fanny DOUVERE, UNESCO ; Ameer ABDULLA, IUCN

Objective: The event will result in a greater understanding of the potential to identify marine features within Exculsive Economic Zones that are not yet protected or part of a marine protected area network. The key steps that are needed to identify and prepare more marine World Heritage nominations will be discussed including marine biodiversity inventories, tentative lists, regional cooperation, funding and national support.

  • §  Discussion: Participants will discuss marine features identified in Marine thematic study, value of regional comparisons and planning, need to update tentative lists and consider establishment of new protected areas (and extensions).
  • §  Conclusion: Practical steps to accelerate addition of marine sites to national tentative lists and how to ensure strong marine World Heritage nominations will be discussed and recommendations will be proposed to target national governments and potential donors.

MPAs at large ocean scales: history, challenges and progress (WS2C2)

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM ; JOLIETTE

Chairpersons: Alan FRIEDLANDER, University of Hawaii ; Naia LEWIS, Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument and UNESCO World Heritage Site
 
Contributors: Pierre LEENHARDT, CRIOBE - USR3278

The objective of this workshop is to apply experience and lessons learned in large-scale MPA management in order to better guide effective practice at current and future sites.

 

1- What does our global experience and lessons learned tell us in regard to scaling up marine protection?  What are the key take-away points?

2- What are the social (including economic, political, cultural) and logistical challenges that MPAs face in trying to scale up to larger areas/sizes, globally?

3- How do smaller-scale MPAs complement large-scale MPAs?

4- What best practices would you recommend to newly declared large-scale MPAs?

5- What practical guidance or advice would you give to a new manager of a large-scale MPA?

6- How can large-scale (and especially remote) MPAs cultivate and maintain a connection to society amd local communities?

 

Ocean-scale ecosystems

Migratory species and MPAs - Part 1 (WS2D2A)

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM ; AMPHITHEATRE AMU

Chairpersons: Tundi AGARDY, Sound Seas ; Ben LASCELLES, BirdLife International
 
Contributors: Helene LABACH, GIS3M ; Léa DAVID , GIS3M ; Vincent RIDOUX, University La Rochelle ; Giuseppe NOTARBARTOLO DI SCIARA, Tethys Research Institute ; Clara PéRON, Centre d’Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive – CEFE-CNRS- 1919, route de Mende, Montpellier, France ; Alice DELLA PENNA ; Francesco DOVIDIO, upmc ; Alice SOCCODATO, UPMC, Paris ; Jorge FONTES ; Sara ECKERT, Imperial college, London ; David KAPLAN, Institut de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD) ; Thierry MICOL, LPO ; Kristin KASCHNER, Albert-Ludwigs-University of Freiburg ; Alexandra MAUFROY, IRD ; Maite LOUZAO, Spanish Institute of Oceanography ; Geoffroy CITEGETSE, BirdLife International ; Alexandre GIRARD, Renatura ; Angela STADEL, Canadian Wildlife Service ; Annabelle CUTTELOD, IUCN

On the specificities and feasibility of pelagic MPAs, and especially their moving and tri-dimensional aspects.

We aim to draw some conclusions/recommendations of this important conference on the theme of how to identify important sites for the pelagic domain, how to ensure that the scientific data feeds into the policy process and support management decisions.

Session 1 - Methods for site identification for migratory species (10:00-10:45). Chair - Ben Lascelles.

·         How can species data best be linked to oceanographic variables?

·         Which analysis work well, not so well? 

Session 2 – Site prioritisation for migratory species (10:45-11:30). Chair – Tundi Agardy 

·         Whether these indicator species are good candidates for umbrella species, i.e. do they capture other taxa and help identify true priority sites?

·         How to ensure different criteria are coherent and mutually reinforcing? (e.g. need for site prioritisation criteria for other taxa – turtles, sharks)

Session 3 – Design and monitoring of MPAs for migratory species (12:10-12:45). Chair – Annabelle Cuttelod

·         How can we use migratory species data to support the design of MPAs, provide recommendations for dedicated conservation actions and frame MPA management options, and how to incorporate trade-offs?

·         Value of monitoring. What are the techniques available? How can scientific monitoring feed back into policy process and management decision making?

·         How to assess if MPA networks are working? How to strengthen MPAs for mega fauna?

Migratory species and MPAs - Part 2 (WS2D2B)

11:45 AM - 1:15 PM ; AMPHITHEATRE AMU

Chairpersons: Annabelle CUTTELOD, IUCN
 
Contributors: Giuseppe NOTARBARTOLO DI SCIARA, Tethys Research Institute ; Tundi AGARDY, Sound Seas ; Sara ECKERT, Imperial college, London ; David KAPLAN, Institut de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD) ; Thierry MICOL, LPO ; Alexandre GIRARD, Renatura ; Angela STADEL, Canadian Wildlife Service ; Helene LABACH, GIS3M ; Vincent RIDOUX, Université de La Rochelle ; Clara PERON, CEFE, CNRS, France ; Alice DELLA PENNA, LOCEAN-IPSL,Paris ; Alice SOCCODATO, UPMC ; Lascelles BEN, BirdLife International ; Maite LOUZAO, Spanish Institute of Oceanography ; Jorge FONTES, IMAR center at the University of the Azores ; Léa DAVID, EcoOcéan Institut / Parc National des Calanques ; Kristin KASCHNER, Albert-Ludwigs-University of Freiburg ; Alexandra MAUFROY, IRD ; Geoffroy CITEGETSE, BirdLife International ; Francesco D'OVIDIO, LOCEAN-IPSL, Paris, France

On the specificities and feasibility of pelagic MPAs, and especially their moving and tri-dimensional aspects.

We aim to draw some conclusions/recommendations of this important conference on the theme of how to identify important sites for the pelagic domain, how to ensure that the scientific data feeds into the policy process and support management decisions.

Session 1 - Methods for site identification for migratory species (10:00-10:45). Chair - Ben Lascelles.

·         How can species data best be linked to oceanographic variables?

·         Which analysis work well, not so well? 

Session 2 – Site prioritisation for migratory species (10:45-11:30). Chair – Tundi Agardy 

·         Whether these indicator species are good candidates for umbrella species, i.e. do they capture other taxa and help identify true priority sites?

·         How to ensure different criteria are coherent and mutually reinforcing? (e.g. need for site prioritisation criteria for other taxa – turtles, sharks)

Session 3 – Design and monitoring of MPAs for migratory species (12:10-12:45). Chair – Annabelle Cuttelod

·         How can we use migratory species data to support the design of MPAs, provide recommendations for dedicated conservation actions and frame MPA management options, and how to incorporate trade-offs?

·         Value of monitoring. What are the techniques available? How can scientific monitoring feed back into policy process and management decision making?

·         How to assess if MPA networks are working? How to strengthen MPAs for mega fauna?

The challenges of implementing deep-sea MPAs (WS2D1)

11:45 AM - 1:15 PM ; JOLIETTE

Chairpersons: Miles MACMILLAN-LAWLER, GRID-Arendal ; Philip WEAVER, Seascap Consultants
 
Contributors: Chris SMITH, Hellenic Centre for Marine Research (HCMR) Greece ; Sophie ARNAUD-HAOND, IFREMER - Sète ; Virginie TILOT, MNHN ; Christine PERGENT-MARTINI, EqEL, University of Corsica, France ; Nicolas FOURNIER, Oceana ; Nadia PAPADOPOULOU, Hellenic Centre for Marine Research ; Jorge JIMENEZ, MarViva ; Anthony GREHAN, National University of Ireland - Galway ; Juan BEZAURY-CREEL, The Nature Conservancy

An experience-based discussion of the possibility and challenges of designing MPAs for deep-sea ecosystems.

This workshop aims to address the major challenges to the development of deep-water marine protected areas and discuss ways to overcome these challenges. The workshop will examine three thematic areas in relation to the establishment of deep-sea marine protected areas: the tools and approaches; identifying priority areas for protection; and the representativeness of deep-sea MPAs. Each theme will have a short scene setting presentation by a small group of participants, followed by a rapid discussion of the main challenges and identification of possible solutions. The workshop will wrap up by identifying the three major challenges that need to be addressed for the continued development of deep-sea MPAs.

Tools and approaches to support MPAs
Survey techniques

Acoustic survey technologies to support MPAs (KC2E3)

3:15 PM - 4:45 PM ; EUGENIE

Contributors: Delphine MATHIAS , GIPSA-Lab, Chaire Chorus, Grenoble INP ; Céline ARTERO, ONCFS, Guyane Française

As the Ocean is an excellent sound waveguide, the marine environment is a noisy place filled with biotic sounds (marine mammals, fish, invertebrates) and abiotic sounds (wind, rain, boats, etc.). Acoustic methods can then be used across ocean, in shallow water environments (the most impacted by human activities), as well as in deep, dark and murky waters, when light and other cues are not available. In recent years,
underwater acoustics has become increasingly widespread to gauge and track biological activity, species presence and diversity, and monitor marine ecosystems. In this Knowledge Cafe, Celine Artero and Delphine Mathias will discuss how underwater acoustic is useful in their respective research studies.
Celine Artero will explain the use of an acoustic camera to localize and study the abundance of a critically endangered species without any visibility whereas Delphine Mathias will show how passive acoustic monitoring is used in the Iroise Natural Marine Park to study the natural and anthropogenic sound contributions to the soundscape.

How Argos supports MPA networks (KC2E1)

3:15 PM - 4:45 PM ; EUGENIE

Contributors: Frederique BLANC, Spatial Marine & Environnemental Information Value Chain, CLS ; Patrick HALPIN, Marine Geospatial Ecology Lab, Duke University, USA ; Ben LASCELLES, BirdLife International ; Garance WELLER, Geopositioning and Data Collection Systems for Wildlife applications CLS

CLS, unique operator of the ARGOS system on behalf the space agency CNES, NOAA, EUMETSAT and ISRO, is in charge of managing the user’s program, geo positioning platforms, distributing and archiving data for scientists since 30 years. While at International, European and national levels there is a real wish to reference observation systems and collect public data, CLS contributes to inventories of species and habitat as seen through ARGOS programs. There is a real possibility of  valorizing ARGOS patrimony to serve the scientific and institutional community. This is possible through services to store and improve existing archive, through services to share information, look at ecosystems, their history and environment through cross analysis and data transformation, providing tools and indicators.

This KC is the opportunity to share information and point of view between ARGOS operator and existing Marine Information Systems and strengthen collaborations.

How remote sensing from space can support MPA networks (KC2E2)

11:45 AM - 1:15 PM ; EUGENIE

Contributors: Frederique BLANC, Spatial Marine & Environnemental Information Value Chain, CLS ; Shuhei SAWAYAMA, Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute, The University of Tokyo

How remote sensing from space can support MPA networks (KC2E2)

The role of Geographic Information Systems for MPAs (KC2E4)

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM ; EUGENIE

Contributors: Caterina DE VIVO, Centro Studi Interdisiplinari Gaiola onlus- IMT Institute of Advanced Studies Lucca ; Jan EKEBOM, Metsahallitus Natural Heritage Services ; Mats WESTERBOM, Metsähallitus Natural Heritage Services

The knowledge café KC2E4 focus on technical and analytical solutions, in particular GIS solutions, spatial research and management problems related to MPAs and ecosystem based spatial planning and management. Each participant is expected to present her/his problem and challenge for the rest of the coffee table. We can, at least, ensure examples from ecological studies on reefs, GIS analysis of lagoons and examples of monitoring and management of MPAs (the 3 accepted abstracts for KC2E). The session is equally open for other presentations as well. The presenters get a first opportunity to present her/his solution and then the rest of the coffee table experts suggests their solutions to the problem. The session will finish with a set of solutions to solve spatial problems related to marine nature conservation. We welcome participants from all parts of our blue planet. Participants may bring printouts to share with the rest of the coffee table (NB! no PPTs!).

Aerial survey techniques (WS2E1)

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM ; NOTRE DAME

Chairpersons: Marc REHFISCH, APEM Ltd
 
Contributors: Alfredo SIMAO DA SILVA, IBAP : Institut pour la biodiversité et les aires protégées de Guinée Bissau ; Marion BROQUERE, collectif en Haut ! ; Katia BALLORAIN, Agence des aires marines protégées ; Peter MACKELWORTH, Blue World Institute ; Marc LENNON, SAS ACTIMAR

To be able to designate a MPA it is important to have sound information about the species and numbers of animals that it holds. Once a MPA is designated it is good practice to monitor the population trends of the species that it has been designated for. Traditionally boat survey data have underpinned the designation of MPAs and have been used to monitor population trends. The aim of this workshop is to assess whether other survey techniques now exist that could support or replace the valuable role provided by boat surveys. The main targets considered for survey are coastal habitat including coral reefs, seabirds, marine mammals, sea turtles and some larger fish. The novel survey approaches are based on photographs and other forms of remote sensing collected from kites, planes, drones and other autonomous vehicles. The workshop is expected to recommend various novel surveying and monitoring approaches for MPAs.

Underwater observation techniques to support MPA creation and management (WS2E2)

11:45 AM - 1:15 PM ; NOTRE DAME

Chairpersons: Dominique PELLETIER, IFREMER ; Renata FERRARI, University of Sydney
 
Contributors: Vincent MARAN, French Federation for Underwater Studies and Sports ; Patrice PLA, ACSA-ALCEN ; Winram WILLIAM, The Watermen Project ; Dorothée COULOMB, ACSA

Observing marine animals within their habitat is probably the best way to understand their behaviour and interactions. Many underwater observation techniques are available, from breath-hold or scuba diving, to high technology fixed devices and autonomous vehicles. However, beyond the magnificent images of a largely unknown world, how can these observations help in preserving marine species and their environment? This workshop will first draw a panel of various observation techniques through a contrasted selection of underwater studies. A discussion will follow on how these techniques can complement each other for the benefit of marine life preservation. In particular, practical recommendations will be proposed, in terms of Marine Protected Areas management and public involvement.

Inventories

Historical time series and how they support MPAs (KC2F1)

11:45 AM - 1:15 PM ; EUGENIE

Contributors: Regen JAMIESON, New England Aquarium ; Beau DOHERTY, Sea Around Us Project

Objective: The objective of this Knowledge Café is for scientists and managers to come together and discuss how and why historical time series support Marine Protected Area managers and policy makers in decision-making.
Possible Discussion Topics:
• There are large gaps (missing and/or incomplete data) in many time series, how do we deal with this? For example, how do we integrate anecdotal information and traditional knowledge in lieu of scientific data being available?
• Why is this important? Having complete time series and understanding trends in fisheries is necessary for effective management. For many long-lived species it is critical to have long-term time series for fisheries management and conservation goals (i.e. shifting baselines).

Creating and using marine habitat maps for MPA management - Part 1 (WS2F3A)

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM ; ESTAQUE

Chairpersons: Markku VIITASALO, Finnish Environment Institute SYKE
 
Contributors: Henna RINNE, Finnish Environment Institute ; Michael HALDIN ; Alessandra ACCORNERO-PICON, Parc National des Calanques, France ; Cobian DORKA, CITMA ; Benjamin GUICHARD, French Marine Protected Areas Agency ; Jonathan DAEDEN, LIENSs

This session will address the challenges of integrating geospatial data to map conservation, and other biologicalfeatures to the end of facilitating MPA management (or broadly, marine spatial planning). The specific challenges that will be tackled include: data collection (methods, sampling design, etc), data analysis (is modelling a useful tool?), spatial scale (how can it be addressed?), and format of final map product (from paper and GIS maps, to web mapping services). We will share experiences, and define an optimal mapping workflow that could be used in an ideal situation of no time or budget constraints.

Creating and using marine habitat maps for MPA management - Part 2 (WS2F3B)

11:45 AM - 1:15 PM ; ESTAQUE

Chairpersons: David PEñA, Fundación Biodiversidad ; Genoveva GONZALEZ-MIRELIS, IMR
 
Contributors: Serge PLANES, CRIOBE - EPHE/CNRS ; Elvira VALBUENA ; Lena AVELLAN ; Hannah CARR, The Joint Nature Conservation Committee ; Jean-luc SOLANDT, marine conservation society

This session will address the challenges of integrating geospatial data to map conservation, and other biologicalfeatures to the end of facilitating MPA management (or broadly, marine spatial planning). The specific challenges that will be tackled include: data collection (methods, sampling design, etc), data analysis (is modelling a useful tool?), spatial scale (how can it be addressed?), and format of final map product (from paper and GIS maps, to web mapping services). We will share experiences, and define an optimal mapping workflow that could be used in an ideal situation of no time or budget constraints.

Impact assessment

Assessing impacts on intertidal areas (KC2G6)

11:45 AM - 1:15 PM ; EUGENIE

Contributors: Johanna HERFAUT, Agence des aires marines protégées ; Maud BERNARD, Ifremer brest

A sustainable management of seafood harvesting in MPAs needs a good knowledge of the activity and these potential impacts on marine habitats. Assessment methods (with difficulties on field), choosing relevant measures, building Smart indicators (Simple, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic, and Time limited indicator) are broad questions that MPAs managers have to face dealing with sea food harvesting.

During the knowledge café, we will focus on the necessary work and schedule that need to be implemented to answer these questions.

 

Invasive corallimorph associated with shipwreck at Palmyra Atoll Wildlife (KC2G5)

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM ; EUGENIE


Palmyra Atoll National Wildlife Refuge has had numerous invasive species issues including rats, insects, and plants.  One of the most pressing issues in the marine environment is the aggressive spread of the corallimorph, Rhodactis howesii.  Technically not an invasive species, the growth of this organism appears to be stimulated by dissolved iron from a nearby corroding shipwreck.  The introduction of iron has caused a localized phase shift where the ecosystem is changing from the ecologically-diverse coral reef assemblage with its associated fauna to one completely dominated by a single species.  Over the last 20 years since the occurrence of the shipwreck, the corallimorph has spread over an approximately 3 km2 area surrounding the wreck site.  With shipwreck removal scheduled for December 2013, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is poised to support and document the recovery of an impacted coral reef and a phase shift from an invasive dominated reef scape, back to a healthy coral reef community.

The impact of oil spills on MPAs (KC2G4)

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM ; EUGENIE

Contributors: Leopoldo Cavaleri GERHARDINGER, Universidade Estadual de Campinas ; Hyungsoo NOH, National Park Research Institute of Korea National Park Service ; Mariana BENDER, Universidade Federal do Paraná

This knowledge cafe will explore current developments in offshore oil mining and associated social-ecological risks and issues raised. The session will be triggered by study-case illustrations on emerging patterns in Brazil. The session aims to strengthen broad understanding around the subject as well as to enhance connectivity of interested research community. 

The impact of underwater noise on cetaceans (KC2G3)

11:45 AM - 1:15 PM ; EUGENIE

Contributors: Eleman AYCA, University of Southampton ; Linda NOWLAN, WWF-Canada ; Cedric GERVAISE, Fondation Grenoble INP

The objectives of the Knowledge Cafe on  The impact of underwater noise on cetaceans are to:

·         Review sources of anthropogenic noise and its effects on marine animals;

·         Discuss current and alternative mitigation methods for underwater noise;

·         Examine voluntary standards (eg. IMO guidelines on shipping noise, port incentives, etc.,) and discuss how they might fit into noise management;

·         Examine case histories of noise management eg. EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive), and

·         Determine how best to bring underwater noise management into marine planning processes.

Understanding the impacts of marine renewable energy (KC2G2)

11:45 AM - 1:15 PM ; EUGENIE

Contributors: Morgane LEJART, France Energies Marines ; Olivier LE BRUN, Créocéan Pacifique ; Nicolas WALLET, Cornwall Council

On the impact of renewable marine energy (wind farm and hydropower) on the extent of its compatibility with MPAs.

Understanding the impacts of sand and gravel extraction on MPAs (KC2G1)

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM ; EUGENIE

Contributors: Ville KARVINEN, Finnish Environment Institute

The purpose of the knowledge café is to discuss the topic to bring out knowledge, ideas,
thoughts and insights on the subject, for sharing with the larger group. The process is being
facilitated by working in small groups or pairs to encourage participation. Questions posed for
the cases being worked on can include such as:
● What kind of impacts does the case have on the marine environment and MPAs?
● What can be done to minimize the impacts?
● How would the case proceed in a your country?
● Do you have experiences to share on these kind of cases?
● How can the differing interests of extraction and protection be reconciled in this case?
The actual duration of the group/pair discussion and the final session depend on the amount of
time available for the whole knowledge café.

Assessing the impacts of commercial fishing (WS2G3)

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM ; MUCEM

Chairpersons: Laurence LE DIREACH, GIS Posidonie ; Randolph VELTEROP, Natural England
 
Contributors: Frederique ALBAN, UBO - UMR AMURE ; Maša FRLETA - VALIć, Marine Explorers Society - 20.000 Leagues ; Vasiliki MARKANTONATOU, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Dipartimento Scienze della Vita e Dell’Ambiente (DISVA) ; Renato SILVANO, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Dept. of Ecology, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil ; Annabelle AISH, Service du Patrimoine Naturel, Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle

Through case study examples the first part of this session aims to understand the key components and evidence requirements for the effective management of fisheries related impacts. The session will build understanding of the direct impacts of fishing pressure on commercial fish stocks and vulnerable seabed habitats and ultimately explore what governance, enforcement tools and surveillance is required for the successful management of commercial fishing impacts.

The second session will explore how assessment tools including conceptual models can be used to inform whether current management practices are effective and sufficient. This session also explores the risk based assessment and management approaches required to effectively implement and regulate fishing impacts over large geographic scales.

Assessing the impacts of recreational fishing (WS2G4)

11:45 AM - 1:15 PM ; MUCEM

Chairpersons: Patrice FRANCOUR, Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis Laboratoire ECOMERS
 
Contributors: SOPHIE BAYCHELIER, Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis Laboratoire ECOMERS ; Marion VERDOIT-JARRAYA, UPVD ; Eric CHARBONNEL, Parc Marin de la Côte Bleue ; Catherine PIANTE, WWF-France ; Elodie MAISON, GIP Aten ; Pascaline BODILIS, Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis Laboratoire ECOMERS

A discussion of research and survey results relative to the impact of leisure fisheries on MPAs, and of ways to keep it in check. We will try to address the following issues :

-what are the field of research to prioritize regarding assessment of the impacts of the recreational fishing

- what are the technical recommendations to develop a program to monitorof the impacts of recreational fishing in an MPA?

- How to work more effectively on the management of the recreational fishing activities ?

Planning and managing MPAs in a climate-changing world (WS2G1)

3:15 PM - 4:45 PM ; NOTRE DAME

Chairpersons: Katherine YATES, University of Ulster
 
Contributors: Azusa MAKINO, University of Queensland ; Thamasak YEEMIN, Ramkhamhaeng University ; Nathaniel BENSOUSSAN, IPSO FACTO

Workshop Outline

·         Delegates will be greeted on entry and handed out a questionnaire, pertaining to the workshop topic. There will be an announcement to explain that the questionnaire is part of the workshop and the screen will also display a message about it, they will be given roughly 10 minutes to complete it

·          The chair will introduce the panel and outline the format of the session

·         Each member of the panel will give a short (5minutes, followed by 2minutes for questions) presentation pertaining to the workshop topic

·         The floor will then be open for discussion. The discussion will lead on from the presentations, but there will also be a number of prepared open questions that will be used to keep things going.

·         The last ten minutes will be a wrap up discussions and some summary statements

·         Notes will be taken throughout and a report written

Workshop Summary

Marine protected areas (MPAs) are playing an increasingly important role in addressing conservation and fisheries management goals. There is an urgent need to incorporate the consequences of climate change into MPA thinking, as these will have significant impacts on both the achievement of those goals and, possibly, the form of them. The objective of this workshop is to explore ways to do this. We will discuss how climate change predictions could be incorporated into MPA planning and management, exploring the strengths and weaknesses of some of the possible methodologies. We will also discuss barriers to incorporation, in particular aiming to gain a wider understanding of what the information needs are and how these can be better transferred between research and management. Finally we will discuss the value and limitations of MPAs for both and understanding mitigating climate change impacts.

Understanding the impact of leisure activities on MPAs (WS2G2)

3:15 PM - 4:45 PM ; MUCEM

Chairpersons: Catherine PIANTE, WWF France
 
Contributors: Michel COULOMB , Local Olympic Sports Commitee of Var ; Sophie Véronique AVILA FOUCAT, Instituto de Investigaciones Económicas/UNAM ; Pascal MAYOL, Souffleurs d'Ecume

The objective of the workshop is to discuss research and survey results relative to the impacts of leisure activities on MPAs and potential management options. First, these topics will be illustrated through selected case studies, mainly in three fields:  whale-watching, scuba-diving and integrated approaches. Following the presentations of case studies, the discussion will address the following issues: what are the needs for data on ecosystems, visitors and economic activities to improve tourism management in marine areas? What are the benefits of integrated approaches of the monitoring and management of leisure activities in MPAs? How to reconcile recreational uses and marine ecosystems protection?  What are the pros and cons of mandatory regulations versus voluntary actions? How to involve stakeholders into marine environment preservation: through raising awareness by information, through their participation to data collection, …? 

Socioeconomics and MPAs
Cultural and traditional heritage and perspectives

Cultural and traditional knowledge in marine World Heritage Sites (KC2H1)

11:45 AM - 1:15 PM ; EUGENIE

Contributors: Carole MARTINEZ, International Union for Conservation of Nature ; Josephine LANGLEY, International Union for Conservation of Nature ; Fanny DOUVERE, UNESCO World Heritage Centre

Objective: Local communities and traditional knowledge are an important component for the management of marine World Heritage sites. They possess their own rich understandings about the natural milieu and their own interpretations about how it should be managed. When these are ignored by scientists and resource managers, efforts to conserve local ecosystems may falter and local livelihoods may be undermined. This knowledge café will convene discussions on how local community knowledge can play a larger role in the protection and management of the Outstanding Universal Value of marine World Heritage. Participants will consider opportunities for increasing and recognising the role of community participation in marine World Heritage.

Conclusion: Putting communities and cultural heritage on the map as part of the WH marine agenda. Participants will consider recommendations to particular audiences that address governance specific to the marine protected area context, culture versus nature, processes related to World Heritage and the interface between livelihoods and the coastal environment. 

Cultural, spiritual and traditional knowledge and MPAs in West Africa (KC2H2)

3:15 PM - 4:45 PM ; EUGENIE

Contributors: Barthelemy BATIENO, Partenariat Régional pour la Conservation de la zone côtière et Marine en Afrique de l'Ouest - PRCM ; Claude SENE, ONG APTE

How sacred sites in West Africa play a fundamental role in the management success of MPAs.

The role of culture and tradition in MPA management: Case studies (WS2H2)

11:45 AM - 1:15 PM ; SAINT-JEAN

Chairpersons: Samuel CORNIER, CREDO/LACITO ; Anne MCDONALD, Sophia University, Japan
 
Contributors: Ibrahima FALL, Université du Sénégal ; Steve DIGGON, Coastal First Nations - Great Bear Initiative ; Toti TEIKIEHUUPOKO, Motu haka fédération culturelle et environnementale des iles Marquises

During the past decades recent approaches of MPAs governance have called for more cultural and socio-economical considerations. Indeed, coastal areas often represent an important cultural heritage for local populations. Whether we consider marine resources and territories for their vital or their symbolic components, all have contributed to shape the identities of coastal communities, their socio-political organization, but also their economic activities. Thereby, MPAs must deal with local features that reflect the diversity of traditional marine management systems. Based on a sample of case studies, the objective of this workshop is to bring a feedback on how traditional marine management systems can contribute to MPAs. Special attention will be paid to the conceptual tools on which relies such integration (participative co-management, community-based management, multi/trans-disciplinary methodology). The workshop will also bring a focus on the interactions between traditional management systems and the normative framework of MPAs, to the interactions between stakeholders and to some potential induced effects of such projects on culture and tradition. The report and the conclusions of the workshop (combined with WS2H1) should finally bring some recommendations in order to improve MPAs management.

The role of culture and tradition in MPA policy (WS2H1)

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM ; SAINT-JEAN

Chairpersons: Marjo VIERROS, United Nations University ; Raphaëlle DANCETTE, Université du Québec à Rimouski (UQAR)
 
Contributors: Simon NANCY, collectif en Haut ! ; Frédéric HAUTCOEUR, GIZ-PNBA ; Elizabeth WREN, GBRMPA ; Nathalie HUET, Drassm

Workshop objectives

This workshop will examine the role and value of culture in the management and protection of the marine environment, including through the involvement of indigenous peoples and local communities and their knowledge in the management process. The workshop will look at methods for successful community and traditional owner participation and leadership in management, as well as the international impact of culture-based management systems. Overall, the workshop aims to extract key lessons about the role that people and their cultures play in making marine conservation and management successful, and will also look at how these successes can best be communicated to a broader audience.

Ecosystem services

Compensation and MPAs (KC2I1)

3:15 PM - 4:45 PM ; EUGENIE

Contributors: Pierre SCEMAMA, Ifremer ; Nicolas PASCAL, CRIOBE ; Sylvain PIOCH, Université Montpellier 3 - CEFE

The compensation of anthropogenic impacts is intended to offset the negative environmental effects of a project, plan or program (planning, infrastructure, industry ...) by a positive action. The compensatory measures under the principle of "no net loss" pursues a neutral ecological balance with a potential overall improvement of the ecological value of a site. They rely on ecological engineering to define, implement and monitor rehabilitation measures, restoration and re-creation of habitats (and sometimes changing management practices). They are accompanied by compensation ratios, computed from different methods based on the notions of equivalence of habitats which are supposed to represent the "value" of the habitat impacted.

Difficulties of compensation in marine environment are many and varied. On the one hand, it is not possible to acquire land at sea to implement a compensatory measure. The maritime public domain (DPM) is inalienable and imprescriptible and specific legal framework for mastering the use must be thorough. On the other hand, the compensation ratios using computational methods to quantify or qualify the impact on the habitat and ecosystem services are complex and far from being standardized. 

Similarly, the reconstruction of the environment raises issues of technical feasibility, availability of the ressource and lack of knowledge on ecosystem processes. The monitoring of the effectiveness of the measure in the long term is rarely discussed whereas it is a key success factor for the implementation of the measure. Finally, the potential for the establishment of compensation banks to standardize the procedure for financing of MPAs should be analised as a priority.

Progress on these questions is presented based on concrete case studies and a comparison with the legal framework of the United States.

Assessing and valuing ecosystem services - Part 1 (WS2I1A)

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM ; HEMICYCLE MPM

Chairpersons: Linwood PENDLETON, Duke University's Nicholas Institute ; Mahé CHARLES, Agence des aires marines protégées
 
Contributors: Rémi MONGRUEL, Ifremer ; Aymen CHAREF, European Commission - DG Joint Research Centre, Institute for Protection and Security of the Citizen ; Olivia LANGMEAD, Plymouth University Marine Institute/Marine Biological Association ; Wendy DODDS, Plymouth University

In both parts of the workshop, conceptual presentations precedes cases studies presentations which  lead up to a discussion of the overall concept of ecosystem services (ES) assessment and of how it can be applied to MPA management and related issues such as sustainable financing.

Assessing and valuing ecosystem services - Part 2 (WS2I1B)

11:45 AM - 1:15 PM ; HEMICYCLE MPM

Chairpersons: Linwood PENDLETON, Duke University's Nicholas Institute ; Mahé CHARLES, Agence des aires marines protégées
 
Contributors: Nicolas PASCAL, CRIOBE, Insular Research Center and Environment Observatory ; Anai MANGOS, Plan Bleu ; Christian NEUMANN, UNEP ; Gilles LANDRIEU, Parcs nationaux de France ; Florence KROWICKI, ACTeon ; Julia BENTZ, Cibio Research centre in Biodiversity and Genetic Resources University of the Azores, Ponta Delgada, Azores ; Esther WOLFS, WKICS

In both parts of the workshop, conceptual presentations precedes cases studies presentations which  lead up to a discussion of the overall concept of ecosystem services (ES) assessment and of how it can be applied to MPA management and related issues such as sustainable financing.

Participatory approaches

Best practices in fishers’ participation in MPA management (KC2J3)

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM ; EUGENIE

Contributors: Houssine NIBANI, AGIR Association de Gestion Intégrée des Ressources ; Natheer ALABSI, The University of Tokyo ; Aristide TAKOUKAM KAMLA, AMMCA ; Jean Michel CULIOLI, Office de l'Environnement de la Corse

In order to set marine protected areas (MPA) it is necessary to integrate the opinions of the affected stakeholders into the design and implementation of the MPAs. First, I have surveyed the fishermen awareness on different management measures as part of comprehensive management reforms in the fishing sector of the Red Sea coast of Yemen. I have also explored the fishermen views and expectations on the proposed management reforms.

   In the second part, I have surveyed the fishermen understanding on the different functions of MPAs and the advantages and disadvantages of MPAs from their point of view.

   Finally, the fishermen were asked about the best places in the Red Sea coast of Yemen to establish MPAs and their recommendations that must be taken into account when establishing MPAs were collected and analyzed. 

Diver contributions to habitat mapping (KC2J5)

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM ; EUGENIE

Contributors: Laurent COLOMBET, FFESSM-CNEBS ; Jacques DUMAS, FFESSM Commission Nationale Environnement et Biologie Subaquatiques

"BioOb" present a double interest; allow the divers to discover the participative sciences and to deepen their knowledge of the aquatic environment. The divers constitute a pad of dive naturalist who also serves as inventory.

This data base leans on texts and photos of our site FFESSM DORIS, partner of the MNHN. What guarantees a very good level of reliability of the information supplied to the divers. It this maximizes the reliability of the identifications while offering the possibility to the divers-observers to enrich their knowledge.

 The diver can so discover the participative sciences by contributing to the inventory and\or to the following protocols:

·              Inventory on 4 zones (the Mediterranean Sea, Fresh, Atlantic Water and La Manche and the North Sea) ·       Protocol "Benthos" of Cybelle Méditerranée ·  Protocols "Suivi des poissons côtiers" of Cybelle Méditerranée ·            Protocols "Suivi en pleine eau" of Cybelle Méditerranée

 The various statements are centralized, then they undergo 2 levels of check before being able to be integrated into the data bases of the scientific partners (MNHN-INPN and Cybelle Méditerranée).

For all the sorts of the data base (approximately 2 % of the sorts listed in the INPN (ground include), and approximately 18 000 observations this day), the diver can display an interactive map of the distribution.

The pad of dive in the html format for a maximum of compatibility, can be generated between 2 dates, but also for a group of diver to realize balance sheets(assessments) of training course for example. This little binding and simple initiative, allows a contribution to the knowledge of our underwater heritage of all the divers, is about 150 000 graduates of our Federation.

Incorporating fishers knowledge in MPA planning (KC2J4)

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM ; EUGENIE

Contributors: Katherine YATES, University of Ulster ; Adama MBAYE, Centre de recherche Océanographique de Dakar/Thiaroye (CRODT) ; Hideaki TANOUE, National Fisheries University, Japan

The importance and value of incorporating fishers into MPA planning and management is increasingly recognised, with many MPA failures being attributed to inadequate stakeholder involvement. Not only can incorporating fishers provide the opportunity to minimise negative impact on the fishing community, reduce conflict and increase buy-in, fishers can also provide planners and managers with a wealth of local knowledge.  In this 90 minute Knowledge Cafe delegates will be invited to take part in a series of roundtable discussions. Topics will include: the value of incorporating fishers, tools and techniques for engaging fishers, data collection methods, & encouraging greater recognition of fishers’ data. Delegates select a table of interest and discussions last twenty minutes, before delegates move to another table. The aim of the workshop is to share knowledge and experiences, explore best practice and increase understanding of the benefits and methods of incorporating fishers. 

Perspectives on achieving monitoring through MPA networks (KC2J2)

11:45 AM - 1:15 PM ; EUGENIE

Contributors: Boris DANIEL , Agence des aires marines protégées ; Bruno MEOLA, MEDPAN

The deployment of monitoring devices across the Mediterranean sea via a network of mpa seems appropriate to respond to environmental issues or to position the mpa in a global approach.

Through the experience of different participants the KC try to answer several questions such as:

- What's the point of an operational network in the amp marine monitoring across the Mediterranean sea ?

- Which topics such monitoring network can it provide answers ?

- How and with which players build methodologies for monitoring and observation in each mpa ?

- What protocols pioneers to implement in 2014 , with whom?

- What prospects of enlargement to the public sphere through citizen sciences ?

The operational objective is to identify a monitoring test protocol of the marine environment across the Mediterranea sea to assess the effectiveness and value the network of Mediterranean mpa on selected topics . The implementation of this test may be effective in 2014 in line with the objectives of the association and MEDPAN its scientific strategy .

The role of participatory science in MPA management (KC2J1)

3:15 PM - 4:45 PM ; EUGENIE

Contributors: Luigi CECCARONI, BDigital ; Patrice FRANCOUR, Université NIce. EA ECOMERS ; Olivier MUSARD, Agence des aires marines protégées

Aquatic ecosystems are characterized by an extraordinary mix of human activities (e.g., tourism, fishing, industry) and levels of protection. Given the often existing conflict of interests between conservation and exploitation, the fate of aquatic ecosystems is often a hot political issue; and the attitudes and values of stakeholders in environmental issues become an essential part of the stewardship of conflicting environments. New policies about environmental resources should have citizens’ support and consider public attitudes from the beginning. Even if participatory science is not new, it is going to be more and more important in the coming years. MPA’s managers, scientists and policy makers are seeking the best way to collect data and to interact with the audience about biodiversity issues. At the same time, global awareness and new technology give a larger public the opportunity to be part of environmental stewardship. Beyond the question of data reliability, this knowledge café proposes to explore, starting from many lessons learned, the questions that so many practitioners have to face up when a participatory program is set up and deployed.

Exploring the social dimensions of MPAs: acceptability by society (WS2J4)

3:15 PM - 4:45 PM ; GRAND LARGE

Chairpersons: Douglas YURICK, Parks Canada
 
Contributors: Michelle VOYER, University of Technology, Sydney ; Gilbert DAVID, IRD UMR 228 ESPACE-DEV

Session Outline

The successful establishment and management of MPAs and MPA networks depend upon but too often do not incorporate sufficient attention to socioeconomic considerations and communicating with stakeholders.  Presenters from four continents will outline examples of MPA establishment in six countries, both past and on-going, where various socioeconomic considerations have been central to whether MPA establishment was comparatively straightforward or controversial, often with long-lingering effects in the latter case.  Such effects can be traced to less than optimal approaches to engaging with local citizens and stakeholders, inadequate attention to local socioeconomic factors, particularly those pertaining to fishing communities, and external yet significant opportunities or constraints such as perceptions conveyed in local media.

Each presenter will speak for up to 10 minutes, then engage in a panel exchange and respond to questions from the audience.  Presenters will plan their panel presentation informally, in advance.  Audience participation will be strongly encouraged, and specific examples from their own experience in establishing and managing MPAs or undertaking relevant socioeconomic studies will be especially welcome to contribute to a rich discussion.

 

Summary

This session is intended to consider the diverse experiences and factors, socioeconomic and related (communications in particular), that have contributed and/or have had to be overcome to achieve the establishment of MPAs in several diverse settings in North America, North Africa, Australia and France.  Presentations will be both retrospective in the sense of highlighting historic and lingering difficulties regarding specific MPAs, and prescriptive in outlining better approaches that draw from experience.  It is intended that by the conclusion of the workshop, participants will have learned from the presented examples and interactive discussion of how better to avoid pitfalls and advance the expansion of MPA networks in diverse circumstances.

MPAs through the eyes of fishers (WS2J3)

3:15 PM - 4:45 PM ; SAINT-JEAN

Chairpersons: Jessica SANDERS, FAO / Fisheries and Aquaculture Policy and Economics Division ; Naseegh JAFFER, World Forum of Fisher Peoples (WFFP) ; Lena WESTLUND, FAO
 
Contributors: Gilbert DAVID, Institut de recherche pour le développement ; Duarte F. VIDAL, Recursos Marinos y Pesquerías Universidad de A Coruña ; Catherine SABINOT, Institut de recherche pour le développement ; Leonardo VAZQUEZ, Comunidad y Biodiversidad A.C ; Asma CHAKER, Université Abderrahmane Mira, Béjaïa, Algérie. ; Cristina PITA, Universidade de Aveiro, Portugal

A forward looking discussion on inclusive approaches to MPA designation and management: how can fishing communities, researchers, managers and practitioners work together to deliver sustainable livelihoods, food security and conservation outcomes?

Multidisciplinary approaches to MPA management (WS2J1)

3:15 PM - 4:45 PM ; AMPHITHEATRE AMU

Chairpersons: Nathan BENNETT, University of British Columbia / / BOBLME ; Jean-Charles LARDIC, Mairie de Marseille
 
Contributors: Pascal MARTY, LIENSs UMR CNRS 7266 Université de La Rochelle ; Daniel BEAVER, Centre For Conservation Geography ; Steven TUCKER, U.S. Coast Guard ; Elodie LE CORNU, Center for Ocean Solutions

This workshop will focus on approaches and options for trying to ensure that the full range of ecological, economic, social and political considerations are incorporated into decisions that are being made around MPAs. This implies embracing an ecosystem-based and multidisciplinary approach that integrates all stakeholders and decision makers in a participatory process that considers different values and aspirations.

Drawing on global discourses and using examples from Australia, Thailand, and Marseille, the speakers will explore some of the following key questions. What is the interplay between global conservation decisions and MPA establishment and management challenges? Where and how can scientists be influential in decision-making? How can we foster interdisciplinary relationships between diverse researchers and stakeholders? What are the implications of multiple stressors on potential MPA performance? How can ecological, physical and user information be incorporated to create a common understanding of the seascape so that this concept can be used as a management framework for MPAs.

Using local knowledge in MPA management (WS2J2)

11:45 AM - 1:15 PM ; GRAND LARGE

Chairpersons: Catherine SABINOT, Institut de recherche pour le développement ; Adam REES, Plymouth University
 
Contributors: Sabrina DOYON, Université Laval, Québec-Canada ; Jérôme JOURDAIN, CNPMEM ; Kevin LELEU ; Margarita LAVIDES, Haribon Foundation for the Conservation of Natural Resources

Practical experiences of using local knowledge, especially fishers’, lead up to a discussion how it can be built into MPA design and management.

 

Workshop objectives:

 

−     To highlight the positives of using local knowledge in MPA management.

 

−     To highlight the concordances and discordances of nature regimes (perceptions, knowledge and practices relative to environment) between the stakeholders of an MPA.

 

23 October

Tools for Management and Enforcement

Well-governed and effectively managed protected areas are a proven method for safeguarding both habitats and populations of species and for delivering important ecosystem services. Aichi Target 11, Technical Rationale extended (COP/10/INF/12/Rev.1) ; In accordance with Aichi Target 11, attention must be paid not only to the quantitative objective of protecting 10 percent of the ocean’s surface, but also to the quality of that protection: marine protected areas must be “effectively and equitably managed”. Accordingly, how are management concepts evolving and what are the best conservation strategies and techniques – based on what assessment? How can management plans be further improved and how can they be enforced safely and consistently? Finally, what could be the mechanisms for financing and funding management? Remember: no tools, no management!

 Program Day 3 (PDF) 

WS Codes beginning with WS are Workshops.
KC Codes beginning with KC are Knowledge Cafés.
PA Codes beginning with PA are Ocean+ Pavilion Presentations.

This Program is subject to last-minute changes.

 

PLENARY SESSIONS

Introductive plenary session (PL31) (8:45 AM - 9:45 AM) - AUDITORIUM

Moderators:
Dan LAFFOLEY, WCPA Marine ; Olivier LAROUSSINIE, Agence des aires marines protégées
Speakers:

Charlotte KARIBUHOYE, FIBA ; Marina GOMEI, WWF Mediterranean ; Glenn RICCI, Coastal Resources Center at The University of Rhode Island ; Imen MELIANE, TNC ; Fotios PAPOULIAS, DG Environnement, Commission Européenne ; Pierre MAILLE, Conseil de gestion du Parc Naturel Marin d'Iroise / Conseil Général du Finistère

 

Midday Plenary debate (PL32) (2:30 PM - 3:00 PM) - AUDITORIUM

Moderators:
Carl Gustaf LUNDIN, International Union for Conservation of Nature
Speakers:

Jon DAY, GBRMPA ; Linwood PENDLETON, Duke's Nicholas Institute/NOAA

Management approach to MPAs  - increasing effectiveness

 

Conclusive plenary session (PL33) (5:00 PM - 6:00 PM) - AUDITORIUM

Moderators:
Dan LAFFOLEY, WCPA Marine ; Olivier LAROUSSINIE, Agence des aires marines protégées
Speakers:

Alfredo SIMAO DA SILVA, IBAP : Institut pour la biodiversité et les aires protégées de Guinée Bissau ; Julien CALAS, FFEM ; Alistair GAMMELL, Pew Charitable Trusts ; Fanny DOUVERE, UNESCO

 
 
Streams Areas and Sessions (Workshops and Knowledge Cafés)
Managing MPAs
Management-plan implementation

Ecosystem-based management (KC3A2)

11:45 AM - 1:15 PM ; EUGENIE

Contributors: Charlie SHORT, Ministry of Forests, Lands, and Natural Resource Operations ; Steve DIGGON, Coastal First Nations-Great Bear Initiative

The purpose of this knowledge cafe is to discuss and compare lessons learned regarding the application of ocean zoning techniques including, but not limited to: integrated marine spatial planning, ecosystem based management approaches, marine protected areas, inter-agency collaboration and challenges in applying these tools at varying spatial and temporal scales.

From knowledge to management : the case of the seamounts of the South West Indian Ocean (KC3A3)

3:15 PM - 4:45 PM ; EUGENIE

Contributors: Philippe BOUCHET, Museum national d'Histoire naturelle ; François SIMARD, International Union for Conservation of Nature ; James OLIVER, International Union for Conservation of Nature ; Janique ETIENNE, Fonds Français pour l'Environnement Mondial (FFEM)

This KC aims at presenting and discussing the management of seamounts in the high seas. It will present and discuss the case of the seamounts of the South West Indian Ocean (Walter shoal and South West Indian Ridge). 

Management plan for migrating species (WS3A1)

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM ; MUCEM

Chairpersons: Maÿlis SALIVAS, ACCOBAMS ; Fannie DUBOIS, PELAGOS
 
Contributors: Sophia RAKOTOHARIMALALA, Cetamada ; Alessio MAGLIO, SINAY SAS ; AGNES BENET, PROGEM

The objectives of the workshop is to inform relevant stakeholders about existing tools to integrate marine mammals conservation in Marine Protected Areas and to define steps for a better conservation at a regional level in order to increase management effectiveness.

After introducing a regional Agreement for the conservation of cetaceans in the Mediterranean Sea, Black Sea and Adjacent Atlantic Area (ACCOBAMS), three case studies will be presented: Pelagos Sanctuary for marine mammals in Mediterranean Sea, Marine Mammals Sanctuary of French Polynesia, and, Sainte Marie Island in the Indian Ocean.

Two issues integrating cetacean conservation and management to MPA will be more developed: mitigating the impacts of underwater anthropogenic noise on marine mammals and managing whale-watching activities. 

Management plan from A to Z (WS3A4)

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM ; GRAND LARGE

Chairpersons: Marina GOMEI, WWF Mediterranean
 
Contributors: Andrea Zita BOTELHO, CIBIO - Research Centre in Biodiversity and Genetics Resources, Department of Biology, University of Azores ; Roger FENWICK, Parks Victoria, Canada ; Olivier MUSARD, Agence des aires marines protégées ; Elsa LETEURTRE, Lisode ; Hanna PAULOMAKI

The objective of the workshop is improving participants’ understanding on how to move from paper parks to MPA implementation and from opportunistic approach to long term / objective oriented management planning. The workshop will offer a forum of exchange of best practices applied worldwide on developing and reviewing MPA management plans at local, national, network level. In particular, it will focus on key processes, standards and tools to develop effective and feasible Management Plans; experience on involving stakeholders in the decision making-process; and applying an adaptive approach to review the Management Plan framework.

Discussion will highlight the strategic actions needed to make progress towards successful management planning, which in turns contributes to meet one of the Aichi Biodiversity Targets of achieving effectively managed MPAs.

Stakeholder engagement

Stakeholders involvement in MPAs: lessons learnt from different MPAs around the world - Part 1 (WS3B1A)

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM ; AMPHITHEATRE AMU

Chairpersons: Charlotte KARIBUHOYE, FIBA ; Laurent SOURBES, Zakynthos National Marine Park
 
Contributors: Jacob LEVENSON, Conserve.IO

The workshop aims to emphasize the critical importance of involving stakeholders for efficient MPAs, to provide explicit and complementary examples of stakeholder engagement in different MPAs and stimulate discussion, exchange and create dialogue amongst managers regarding criteria and conditions for and impacts of effective stakeholders involvement. Furthermore, the workshop seeks to enabling formulate recommendations for involving stakeholders effectively beyond procedure requirements. This workshop is structured into three 90 min sessions, which will focus on engaging stakeholders in MPA creation and planning, management  and governance respectively, by promoting interaction among the participants. About 16 case studies will present lessons learnt from different approaches; panel discussions and exchanges with the public will allow for further dialogue and mutual learning. The main expected outcomes of the workshop are: an improved understanding of stakeholders’ involvement in MPA within MPA practitioners and the marine conservation community, the identification of good or best practices and a number of recommendations likely to ensure the sustainable efficiency of an MPA through collaboration with all actors.

Stakeholders involvement in MPAs: lessons learnt from different MPAs around the world - Part 2 (WS3B1B)

11:45 AM - 1:15 PM ; AMPHITHEATRE AMU

Chairpersons: Laurent SOURBES, Zakynthos National Marine Park ; Charlotte KARIBUHOYE , FIBA
 
Contributors: Olivier RAYNAUD, Blue Ventures Conservation ; Britta BAECHLER, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/ CNMI Division of Fish and Wildlife ; Françoise CLARO, MNHN ; Angela STADEL, Environment Canada

The workshop aims to emphasize the critical importance of involving stakeholders for efficient MPAs, to provide explicit and complementary examples of stakeholder engagement in different MPAs and stimulate discussion, exchange and create dialogue amongst managers regarding criteria and conditions for and impacts of effective stakeholders involvement. Furthermore, the workshop seeks to enabling formulate recommendations for involving stakeholders effectively beyond procedure requirements. This workshop is structured into three 90 min sessions, which will focus on engaging stakeholders in MPA creation and planning, management  and governance respectively, by promoting interaction among the participants. About 16 case studies will present lessons learnt from different approaches; panel discussions and exchanges with the public will allow for further dialogue and mutual learning. The main expected outcomes of the workshop are: an improved understanding of stakeholders’ involvement in MPA within MPA practitioners and the marine conservation community, the identification of good or best practices and a number of recommendations likely to ensure the sustainable efficiency of an MPA through collaboration with all actors.

Stakeholders involvement in MPAs: lessons learnt from different MPAs around the world - Part 3 (WS3B1C)

3:15 PM - 4:45 PM ; AMPHITHEATRE AMU

Chairpersons: Laurent SOURBES, Zakynthos National Marine Park ; Charlotte KARIBUHOYE , FIBA
 
Contributors: Sigurd HEIBERG ESPELAND, Institute of Marine Research, Norway ; Wolfe BRET, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service ; Gómez-Villada SARAHI, Amigos para la Conservación de Cabo Pulmo AC

The workshop aims to emphasize the critical importance of involving stakeholders for efficient MPAs, to provide explicit and complementary examples of stakeholder engagement in different MPAs and stimulate discussion, exchange and create dialogue amongst managers regarding criteria and conditions for and impacts of effective stakeholders involvement. Furthermore, the workshop seeks to enabling formulate recommendations for involving stakeholders effectively beyond procedure requirements. This workshop is structured into three 90 min sessions, which will focus on engaging stakeholders in MPA creation and planning, management  and governance respectively, by promoting interaction among the participants. About 16 case studies will present lessons learnt from different approaches; panel discussions and exchanges with the public will allow for further dialogue and mutual learning. The main expected outcomes of the workshop are: an improved understanding of stakeholders’ involvement in MPA within MPA practitioners and the marine conservation community, the identification of good or best practices and a number of recommendations likely to ensure the sustainable efficiency of an MPA through collaboration with all actors.

Financing an MPA on a daily basis

“Private financing” for MPAs (WS3C1)

3:15 PM - 4:45 PM ; MUCEM

Chairpersons: Nicolas PASCAL, CRIOBE, Insular Research Center and Environment Observatory
 
Contributors: Alfredo SIMAO DA SILVA, IBAP : Institut pour la biodiversité et les aires protégées de Guinée Bissau ; Pierre CAMPREDON, UICN ; Eleanor CARTER, Chumbe Island Coral Park ; Sylvain PIOCH, Université Montpellier 3 - CEFE ; Tundi AGARDY, Sound Seas ; Gildas ANDRIAMALALA, Blue Ventures ; Sandro DUJMOVIC, National Park of Brijuni ; Sophie BENBOW, Blue Ventures ; Genti KROMIDHA, Institute for Nature Conservation in Albania ; Michael LUSK, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Private financing” for MPAs : concrete experiences. 
 
The objective of the workshop is to provide concrete illustrations of MPA financing through private sources. Specifically, the potential of instruments to fill the annual financial gap of MPAs as well as the main key factor of success will be highlighted through short and impacting presentations of 10 case studies.
 
Experiences about the following instruments should bring interesting outputs:  (a) Fishery rights, (b) Tourism payments by end-users and/or businesses (c) Conservation agreement experiences (d) Exploratory PES (e.g. coastal protection, sediment trap) (e) Impact compensation mechanisms.

Increasing effectiveness
Certification and standards

Certification and standards: Green List (WS3D2)

11:45 AM - 1:15 PM ; ESTAQUE

Chairpersons: James HARDCASTLE, International Union for Conservation of Nature
 
Contributors: Marco COSTANTINI, WWF - Italy ; Aurélia MORIO, F3E – Pavillon Bleu ; Fondation pour l’Education à l’Environnement en Europe ; Marion PEGUIN, UICN France ; Géraud LEROUX, IUCN ; Carlo FRANZOSINI, WWF - Miramare MPA ; Thierry LEFEBVRE, Comité français de l'UICN

On the implementation of the IUCN Green List to certify MPAs, and on how this process relates to Blue Flag, ISEA and other available tools.

Objective: Based on presenter experiences and case studies, with participant contribution and comment, to generate IMPAC III recommendations on developing standards and certification for MPAs

The 90-minute workshop will divide into 3 parts. The first session will cover the presentations a) twin presentations on the status of the Global IUCN Green List Initiative and relevance to MPAs, and the progress of the partnership in France (including Marseille); b) a presentation on developing and applying standards for MPAs in Italy through ISEA; and c) a presentation from Blue Flag on their initiative to encompass characteristics of MPAs into their certification programme, including through Pavillon Bleu in France.

The second session will involve three roundtables, one for each of the presented topics (IUCN Green List; Blue Flag; ISEA Standards), set up in different corners of the room. Participants will be invited to rotate between tables and contribute to key discussion points to elicit useful recommendations for the presenters. The third session will revert to plenary, where presenters will give a 2-minute summary of the roundtable, before the chair opens the floor for questions and comment.

The outcome will be a distilled set of IMPAC III recommendations for Standards and Certification for MPAs, which will be taken forward by each organization, and hopefully by other partners.

Certification and standards: IUCN Categories (WS3D1)

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM ; ESTAQUE

Chairpersons: James HARDCASTLE, International Union for Conservation of Nature ; Jessica MITCHELL, Fisheries and Oceans Canada
 
Contributors: Sara ECKERT, Imperial college, London ; Hee Jin KANG, Maritime & Ocean Engineering Research Institute/KORDI, Korea ; Belinda JAGO, Marine reserves, Australia ; Helena CALADO, Geography section, Biology Department, Azores University ; Fiona LLEWELLYN, Marine Reserves Coalition, Zoological Society of London ; Jenny GLIKMAN, Memorial University of Newfoundland

To identify where further guidance on applying IUCN protected area categories to MPAs may be warranted, given jurisdictional experiences

WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION:

  1. PRESENTATIONS (ie Pecha-kucha style, no more than 5-7 minutes). 
  2. PANEL DISCUSSION – experts will share their opinions on the topic “Opportunities and challenges to assign IUCN PA Categories to MPAs” before dealing with questions and comments are provided from the plenary
  3. DEVELOP RECOMMENDATIONS – a list of proposed actions and recommendations – such as revisions and adaptations needed, relevance to LMMAs, training in their application by MPA agencies - will be presented for contribution / comment / validation by all participants. 

WORKSHOP OUTCOMES: through presentation of context and experience, participants will gain a further insight into the application of IUCN PA Categories to MPAS. Presenters will receive feedback on their subject and have the chance to participate in discussions through the panel session. IMPAC III and IUCN will receive valuable feedback and recommendations on actions and adaptations to improve their application.

Certification and standards: professionalization (WS3D3)

3:15 PM - 4:45 PM ; ESTAQUE

Chairpersons: Glenn RICCI, Coastal Resources Center at The University of Rhode Island
 
Contributors: Georgina BUSTAMANTE, Campam ; Josephine LANGLEY, International Union for Conservation of Nature ; Alioune KANE, Université Cheikh Anta Diop de Dakar ; David REYNOLDS, NPS/IUCN ; Fanny DOUVERE, UNESCO World Heritage Centre ; Diana M. CRESPO-CAMACHO, Gulf of California MPA Network

Certification and Standards: Professionalization

This Workshop will share information on innovative professional development systems targeting marine protected areas (MPAs) and to enlarge the community of practitioners dedicated to the issue. There are several initiatives pushing for improved professional development systems using a variety of tools (such as training, certification, standards and exchanges) to improve staff performance resulting in improved management outcomes. IUCN and partners believe that high performing MPA professionals are critical to the effective management of MPAs and that a comprehensive professional development system is a useful means to accomplish this objective in many countries. The IUCN Capacity Building Program will be used as an integrator to link the variety of initiatives and methods being used to improve staff capacity which is moving towards standards and certification to establish the profession.

Objectives of this workshop are to:

·         Gather input and seek agreement on elements of a professional development system that set the standards of professional capacity and guide management in developing staff core competence and performance for different regions.

·         Identify innovative programs that are achieving success in professionalizing MPA staff.

Programs that will be highlighted include the IUCN’s Global Partnership for Professionalizing Protected Area Management, the Western Indian Ocean Certification of MPA Professionals and MPA PRO model, an incentive-driven capacity building program for the Gulf of California, the Caribbean Marine Protected Area Management Network and Forum, the marine World Heritage online tools and a Senegalese university program for MPA training.

At the conclusion of this workshop the participants will have contributed to the design of an IUCN professional development framework from which a variety of innovative staff development tools can be linked.

Monitoring, assessment & enforcement

Controlling illegal fisheries (KC3E4)

3:15 PM - 4:45 PM ; EUGENIE

Contributors: Ahmedou OULD HAMADI, PNBA

Feedback on the control of illegal fisheries in large MPAs, especially in Banc d’Arguin National Park (Mauritania).

Le PNBA est un espace où la pêche motorisée a été interdite par sa loi spécifique (la loi 2000-024) et ses décrets d’application. Néanmoins cette même loi a accordé une dérogation aux autochtones résidents (les imraguen) qui bénéficient de l’exclusivité de l’accès à la ressource. Ceci dit, on peut donc en déduire que le rôle du PNBA est la conservation des écosystèmes par la lutte contre la pêche motorisée venant de l’extérieur et le renforcement des contrôles de la pêche des résidents qui utilisent des embarcations à voile (les lanches). Dans le but d’atteindre ses objectifs de préservation et de développement, le PNBA a mis en place depuis 1999 un système de surveillance qui est aujourd’hui considéré comme modèle au niveau de la sous-région. Dans le cadre des améliorations du dispositif cette année, Le parc a mis en service une vedette de 12 m à propulsion mixte (moteur et voile) et mis en place un poste avancé à l’entrée nord de l’AMP (Cap Sainte Anne). 

Controlling unregulated threats in European MPAs (KC3E2)

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM ; EUGENIE

Contributors: Nicolas FOURNIER, Oceana

Possible corrective strategies to manage unregulated threats include ecological anchorage systems, the creation of no-take zones, and the development of processes to manage recreational fishing sustainably.

Success stories in management and enforcement (KC3E3)

11:45 AM - 1:15 PM ; EUGENIE

Contributors: Kate MANNLE, Rare

Highlighting MPA management and enforcement bright spots, this workshop will be of particular interest to MPA managers who are looking for new strategies or who have their own success stories to share

The Californian experience on MPA monitoring and management (KC3E1)

3:15 PM - 4:45 PM ; EUGENIE

Contributors: Matthew ARMSBY, Resources Law Group

After establishing a science-based network of 124 marine protected areas, the State of California created a public-private partnership, the MPA Monitoring Enterprise, to ‘take the pulse’ of ocean ecosystems and evaluate the effectiveness of MPA management. Universities, citizen groups, and government agencies have engaged in activities including “baseline” monitoring to inventory species and habitats at the time of MPA adoption and have begun long-term monitoring to enable assessments of MPA performance over time. Using California as a launching point for discussion, this session will explore innovative tools and approaches that are being developed for (1) designing scientifically rigorous and cost-effective MPA monitoring programs; (2) coordinating the monitoring activities of universities, government agencies, and others; and (3) engaging citizens and nonprofit organizations in science-based monitoring.

Evaluating Management Effectiveness (WS3E1)

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM ; SAINT-JEAN

Chairpersons: Dominique PELLETIER, LEAD-NC, IFREMER
 
Contributors: Thierry CLéMENT, Oréade Brèche ; Milena TEMPESTA, WWF Italy / Miramare Reserve ; Cherryta YUNIA, ministry of forestry ; Marine FUMAROLI ; Prue ADDISON, The University Of Melbourne ; Anne-Sophie BARNAY, Agence des aires marines protégées

Enhancing MPA management effectiveness by learning from best practices and feed-back about tools and methods implemented about effectiveness MPA evaluation

Participants are invited to share their good practices from their MPA/regions according to the focus :

- Evaluation about what ? MPA goals and expected results

- How build and choose good indicators?

- Which monitoring/research is needed ?

- Which helpful tools for managers?

Debate will be facilitated by the workshop speakers and discussions focussed on practical recommendations/needed actions.

Monitoring and assessing impacts on conservation features (WS3E3)

3:15 PM - 4:45 PM ; LA MAJOR

Chairpersons: Alexandra CUNHA, JNCC ; Jen ASHWORTH, Natural England
 
Contributors: Juyoung JEONG, National Park Research Institute of Korea National Park Service ; Marion PEIRACHE, Parc national de Port-Cros ; Sylvain LE ROUX, Service de coopération et d'action culturelle Ambassade de France en Mauritanie ; Cousens SOPHIE, Plymouth University Marine Insistute

Methods used to monitor anthropogenic impacts on conservation features, including observatories.

During this workshop we will review key issues dealing with monitoring anthropogenic impacts on marine conservation and discuss major breakthroughs. Building on own expertise, each speaker will bring their views on issues such as how to define conservation objectives, prioritise features for monitoring, assess and set up common standards monitoring, and a look on best practices on starting long-term monitoring programs. We will discuss issues of scale, the importance of beyond boundaries monitoring and see how to incorporate adaptive management approach into the monitoring cycle. Finally, we will discuss different ways of increasing partnerships monitoring programs as well as the importance of creating MPA observatories as an ultimate process for integrating anthropogenic impacts monitoring.

Our main input from this workshop to the conference will be a 10 point list with innovative ideas that MPA managers should be looking at when monitoring anthropogenic impacts on conservation features.

MPAs benefits for fisheries and livelihoods – part 1 (WS3E2A)

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM ; LA MAJOR

Chairpersons: John TANZER, WWF International
 
Contributors: Paul GIANNASI, Agence des aires marines protégées, Parc naturel marin de Mayotte ; Sophie COUSENS, Project Support Officer (Marine Institute) at Plymouth University ; Jean-Marc ECOUTIN, Institute of Research for Development, Marine Environmental Sciences Laboratory (LEMAR) ; Emma SHEEHAN, Marine Institute Research Fellow, Plymouth University ; Sandra MALLOL, CENTRO OCEANOGRÁFICO DE BALEARES - INSTITUTO ESPAÑOL DE OCEANOGRAFÍA ; Barbara HORTA E COSTA, CCMAR ; Ines SOUSA, CCMAR ; Even MOLAND, Institute of Marine Research

A discussion of various tools to monitor fisheries for the purpose of MPA management, attempting to identify major gaps and possible improvements.

The objectives of this workshop are to

- Provide an up-to-date assessment of current understanding of the benefits of MPAs for fisheries, highlighting experiences of selected case studies;

- Bridge the gap between science and management: looking at the implications of the MPA/fisheries research on policy/management measures;

- Share concrete examples where fishermen and local communities have been engaged in coastal conservation through demonstrating fisheries benefits of MPAs;

- Develop recommendations to ensure MPA practices are improved through demonstrating their relevance to livelihoods.

This issues will be addressed during all this workshop organized in three sections :

Section 1 : Up-to-date assessment of MPAs/fisheries research (10:00 AM – 11:00 AM)

Section 2 : Bridging the gap between science and management (11:00 AM – 12:00 AM)

Section 3 . Catalyzing community buy-in to coastal conservation  (12:15 PM-13:15 PM)

 

MPAs benefits for fisheries and livelihoods – Part 2 (WS3E2B)

11:45 AM - 1:15 PM ; LA MAJOR

Chairpersons: John TANZER, WWF International
 
Contributors: Sandra MALLOL, CENTRO OCEANOGRÁFICO DE BALEARES - INSTITUTO ESPAÑOL DE OCEANOGRAFÍA ; Barbara HORTA E COSTA, CCMAR ; Paul GIANNASI, Agence des aires marines protégées, Parc naturel marin de Mayotte ; Salatou SAMBOU, président de l'association des pêcheurs de Kawawana (Sénégal) ; Antonio DI FRANCO, University of Nice - Sophia Antipolis ; Raymond LAE, Institute of Research for Development (IRD), Marine Environmental Sciences Laboratory (LEMAR)

A discussion of various tools to monitor fisheries for the purpose of MPA management, attempting to identify major gaps and possible improvements.

The objectives of this workshop are to

- Provide an up-to-date assessment of current understanding of the benefits of MPAs for fisheries, highlighting experiences of selected case studies;

- Bridge the gap between science and management: looking at the implications of the MPA/fisheries research on policy/management measures;

- Share concrete examples where fishermen and local communities have been engaged in coastal conservation through demonstrating fisheries benefits of MPAs;

- Develop recommendations to ensure MPA practices are improved through demonstrating their relevance to livelihoods.

This issues will be addressed during all this workshop organized in three sections :

Section 1 : Up-to-date assessment of MPAs/fisheries research (10:00 AM – 11:00 AM)

Section 2 : Bridging the gap between science and management (11:00 AM – 12:00 AM)

Section 3 . Catalyzing community buy-in to coastal conservation  (12:15 PM-13:15 PM)

Strategic Environmental Assessments: application for MPAs - Part 2 (WS3E4B)

11:45 AM - 1:15 PM ; JOLIETTE

Chairpersons: Anne CAILLAUD, International Coral Reef Initiative
 
Contributors: Ana MARTINS DE JESUS, Joint Nature Conservation Committee ; Jérôme PAILLET, Agence des aires marines protégées

Based on case studies from around the world, the concepts and methods underpinning Strategic Environmental Assessments will be workshopped. Special attention is paid to assessing impacts on biodiversity and their cumulative effects, with possible applications to both temperate and tropical habitats. Public engagement and political buy-in aspects will also be workshopped.

Strategic Environmental Assessments: concepts, methods and lessons learned - Part 1 (WS3E4A)

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM ; JOLIETTE

Chairpersons: Anne CAILLAUD, International Coral Reef Initiative
 
Contributors: Ana MARTINS DE JESUS, Joint Nature Conservation Committee ; Jérôme PAILLET, Agence des aires marines protégées

Based on case studies from around the world, the concepts and methods underpinning Strategic Environmental Assessments will be workshopped. Special attention is paid to assessing impacts on biodiversity and their cumulative effects, with possible applications to both temperate and tropical habitats. Public engagement and political buy-in aspects will also be workshopped. 

From MPAs to MPA networks
Planning networks at various scales

Developing mechanisms for Creating Results-based MPA Networks (WS3F1B)

3:15 PM - 4:45 PM ; HEMICYCLE MPM

Chairpersons: Jon DAY, GBRMPA ; Anne WALTON , NOAA
 
Contributors: Stuart KININMONTH, Stockholm Resilience Centre ; Trevor WARD, University of Technology Sydney ; Philip WEAVER, Seascape Consultants

This session will explore approaches, processes and support systems that can contribute to achieving the management objectives of both individual MPAs, and the higher-level objectives at the network level - whether the basis for the network is ecological, social, governance and/or cultural.

It will draw from experiences of MPA practitioners working on 2 stages of network development : (1) NETWORK DESIGN challenging multi-objectives balance and ecologically coherence; (2) MANAGEMENT adressing issues like multi-scale monitoring and adaptive management, stakeholder engagement or enforcement of regulations.

This session will benefit from conclusions of tools (WS3F1A) and national experiences (WS3F2 A and B) and will go further toward creating results-based MPA networks.

Experiences with national MPA networks : Guidelines and Targets (WS3F2A)

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM ; HEMICYCLE MPM

Chairpersons: Lauren WENZEL, NOAA ; Charlton CLARK, Parks Australia, Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities
 
Contributors: Atef LIMAM, RAC/SPA ; Yassine Ramzi SGHAIER, RAC/SPA ; Benjamin PONGE, AAMP ; Saba GUELLOUZ, Agence de Protection et d'Aménagement du Littoral ; Amy RIDGEWAY, JNCC ; Souha EL ASMI, RAC/SPA ; Teruhisa KOMATSU, Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute, The University of Tokyo ; Silvia REVENGA, Spanish Secretariate for Fisheries, Fisheries Protection ; Othman LLEWELLYN, Saudi Wildlife Authority

This workshop provides brief case studies of diverse countries' experiences designing MPA networks, including approaches, tools and technologies, followed by facilitated discussion among speakers and participants.  Speakers will address MPA planning in Japan, France, Lebanon, LIbya, Tunisia, Spain, the United Kingdom and Saudi Arabia.  Key issues to be addressed include:  identifying network goals and objectives, balancing conservation objectives with human uses, identifying suitable sites for protection, the use of science, data and tools in network planning, and incorporating different levels of protection into networks.

Experiences with national MPA networks : Planning and Engagement (WS3F2B)

11:45 AM - 1:15 PM ; HEMICYCLE MPM

Chairpersons: Lauren WENZEL, NOAA ; Charlton CLARK, Parks Australia, Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities
 
Contributors: Nicholas BAX, University of Tasmania/CSIRO ; Joseph DONINI, Office de l'Environnement de la Corse ; Jonathan GARDNER, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand ; Pilar MARIN, Oceana ; Berry MULLIGAN, Flora and Fauna International

This companion workshop to WS3F2A follows a similar format, and addresses key issues and lessons learned related to policy processes and stakeholder engagement based on experiences in Australia, Cambodia, Spain, Corsica, the United States and New Zealand. Topics to be discussed include identifying and overcoming obstacles to implementation, engaging stakeholders, and reconciling MPA science and stakeholder perspectives.

Marine Protected areas: Global Targets and Changing Approaches (WS3F3B)

3:15 PM - 4:45 PM ; LACYDON

Chairpersons: Imen MELIANE, TNC
 
Contributors: Philip DEARDEN, University of Victoria (Canada / BOBLME ; Caleb MCCLENNEN, Wildlife Conservation Society ; Mark SPALDING, The Nature Conservancy ; Jihyun LEE, Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity ; Jorge JIMENEZ, Marviva ; Aulani WILHELM, NOAA- Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument

The 2010 Protected area target under the Convention on biological diversity called for the establishing MPAs network that cover 10% of the world’s ecoregions. This target has been the focus of the marine conservation agenda of countries, NGOs and donor agencies spurring a number of dedicated initiatives and resources to support its achievement. The focus for these efforts was on protecting areas of importance for biodiversity, critical habitats, species, or genetic diversity.

In 2012, the Convention revised the language on spatial protection measures presented in Aichi Target 11 to include four novel concepts that are important to highlight. These include the need for equitably managed sites, placed within a wider framework, and above all, the clear identification of the importance of conserving ecosystem services

We will start the session with a presentation of the recent analyses of MPA coverage showing a dramatic increase over the past few years, which may indicate that the 10% target can be reached by 2020; and spark a discussion on what efforts should be made to achieve the aspects of the target that extend beyond simple metrics of cover, such as management effectiveness, ecosystem services benefits, and management within wider ecosystem settings.

A panel of experts from various stakeholder groups and background will discuss a way forward to successfully implement the Aichi target and measure progress towards effective conservation. Aspects of the debate will touch upon:

• Selection of MPAs that best safeguard ecosystem services and better link to delivering social, cultural and economic benefits to communities. 

• Benchmarks for “effectively and equitably managed” MPAs which need to be taken into account in the design, implementation and reporting on the achievement of Target 11. 

• Definition of “effective area-based conservation measures” in the marine environment, in particular for fisheries management areas

• Approaches for Integrating MPAs into wider spatial planning that reconcile conservation and development objectives.  

We will consequently work to feed the recommendations from this session into the discussions under the World Parks Congress and the CBD COP 12.

Planning network : Innovating tools and methods (WS3F1A)

11:45 AM - 1:15 PM ; SAINT-JEAN

Chairpersons: William MCCLINTOCK, University of California Santa Barbara
 
Contributors: Joachim CLAUDET, CRIOBE CNRS ; Charles GONSON, IFREMER ; Norma SERRA, PacMARA ; Aurore CHASSANITE, USR 3278 CNRS-EPHE ; Günter FöRSTERRA, Huinay Scientific Field Station ; Francine KERSHAW, Columbia University

Marine protected area planning requires the use of geospatial information about the distribution of human activities and natural resources in and around the ocean. This workshop highlights several innovative technologies (Marxan, Flexan, Web-GIS, Seasketch) for organizing, visualizing, analyzing, and discussing geospatial data in the context of MPA planning in the Mediterranean and Black Seas, Chile, New Caledonia, British Columbia, and other regions. We will discuss methods for improving Marxan analyses in data-poor regions, integrating information on genetic population structure derived from molecular ecology and remote sensing techniques, and a framework for incorporating information about human induced pressures and impacts at the appropriate spatial scale. Our discussion will be geared toward helping managers understand who should use these tools (scientists, experts, planners), when they should be used (pre-planning, planning, adaptive management), how these tools may be integrated, and their potential costs. 

Toward a global MPA network: mapping Aichi Target 11 (WS3F3A)

11:45 AM - 1:15 PM ; LACYDON

Chairpersons: Lance MORGAN, Marine Conservation Institute ; Brian MACSHARRY, UNEP WCMC
 

From 1990 to 2013, global marine protected area (MPA) coverage increased from 0.9% to 5.3% in areas under national jurisdiction, and an increasing number of studies show that protected areas make a critical contribution to habitat and species conservation. Currently just over 2% of the marine environment globally is protected, about half of that is no-take marine reserves. To meet the 10% marine Aichi target, an additional six and a half million square kilometres of marine and coastal areas will need to be protected by 2020. Encouragingly, the number and extent of MPAs, including very large offshore MPAs and community-supported MPAs, have increased rapidly in recent years. Since the 1960’s, the World Database of Protected Areas (WDPA) has been the officially mandated repository for global protected areas data. However, the WDPA is only as good as the information provided to it. Since 2009, concerted efforts have been underway to improve the quality, completeness and consistency of the dataset. Many groups now pull data from the WDPA, including MPAtlas, a site that looks to provide additional tools for assessing geographic, national and regional coverage as well as protection level for different types of MPAs.  There is a need to discuss common understandings of what constitutes marine protected areas and define methodologies for calculating the progress towards the Aichi Target – such as what sites should be included in calculating statistics, and what is the best methodology.

MPAs in a changing world

MPAs in a changing world: Island challenges (WS3G2)

11:45 AM - 1:15 PM ; GRAND LARGE

Chairpersons: Alistair GAMMELL, Pew Charitable Trusts
 
Contributors: Carole MARTINEZ, International Union for Conservation of Nature ; Jorge FONTES ; Susana PERERA, CNAP ; Tina BLANDFORD, UK Government ; Heather BRADNER, The Pew Charitable Trusts

The marine biodiversity of islands faces special challenges. Paricipants share their experience in conserving it.

Objective: Based on case studies, and with audience contribution and comment, to generate IMPAC III recommendations on the challenges and opportunities islands have when creating MPAs

 

The 90-minute workshop will divide into 4 parts.

 

$1·         The first session will comprise 8 speed presentations, with each speaker in no more than 3 minutes presenting up to six important points from their MPA case study, their conclusion, and what action they would like to see taken.  Speakers will be:

Susana PERERA: Application of a regional approach to the management of marine and coastal protected areas in Cuba’s Southern Archipelagos;
Tina BLANDFORD: Overview of Marine Protected Areas within the UK Overseas Territories;
Heather BRADNER: Pitcairn – An opportunity to protect a near pristine part of the Pacific;
Alistair GAMMELL: The UK Overseas Territories - An unappreciated opportunity for marine protection:
HONG SUN-KEE: Vision of Island Biocultural Diversity Initiative since IUCN WCC2012;
Jorge FONTES: Towards an ecologically optimal design of Marine Protected Areas in a remote oceanic archipelago – the Azores as a case study;
Felicity BURROWS: Caribbean Challenge Project: The Bahamas Case Study.

 

$1·         This will be followed by a 20 minute audience discussion on the presentation or on other issues audience members wish to raise;

$1·         We will then discuss conclusions for 20 minutes; and finally

$1·         We will spend 20 minutes agreeing what actions we hope will be taken and by whom.

 

The conclusions and actions we agree will be taken forward by the Congress as well as each organization, and hopefully by other partners.

24 October

Governance, Partnerships and Industry Involvement

Because the deterioration of marine ecosystems has multiple and complex causes, protecting the oceans necessarily involves a collective and cross-sectoral effort. The challenge lies in bringing home to users, and especially to industries, the extent to which different marine ecosystems depend on each other – just as the different uses that are made of them are interconnected. Only then will the separate players assume their own share of responsibility. Promising developments that help MPAs connect with widest possible spectrum of users include: the increasing participation of stakeholders in the governance of MPAs; the development of ecosystem-services valuation; and the growing familiarity of MPA managers with communication techniques.

 Program Day 4 (PDF) 

WS Codes beginning with WS are Workshops.
KC Codes beginning with KC are Knowledge Cafés.
PA Codes beginning with PA are Ocean+ Pavilion Presentations.

This Program is subject to last-minute changes.

 

PLENARY SESSIONS

Introductive plenary session (PL41) (8:45 AM - 9:45 AM) - AUDITORIUM

Moderators:
Christophe LEFEBVRE, Agence des aires marines protégées ; François SIMARD, International Union for Conservation of Nature
Speakers:

Charlotte GOBIN, GEF ; Serge Michel GARCIA, IUCN - FEG ; Elizabeth MOORE, NOAA/Office of National Marine Sanctuaries ; Jean-Luc SOLANDT, Marine Conservation Society ; Didier REAULT, Parc des Calanques, ville de Marseille ; Biliana CICIN-SAIN, Global Forum on Ocean, Coasts and Islands

 

Midday Plenary debate (PL42) (2:30 PM - 3:00 PM) - AUDITORIUM

Moderators:
Carl Gustaf LUNDIN, International Union for Conservation of Nature
Speakers:

Steve ROCLIFFE, University of York ; William KOSTKA, Micronesia Conservation Trust, Federated States of Micronesia ; Lisa SVENSSON, Ocean Ambassador, Sweden

Participatory approach to MPAs – Achieving Meaningful and effective engagement

 

Conclusive plenary session (PL43) (5:00 PM - 6:00 PM) - AUDITORIUM

Moderators:
Christophe LEFEBVRE, Agence des aires marines protégées ; François SIMARD, International Union for Conservation of Nature
Speakers:

John TANZER, WWF International ; Jessica SANDERS, FAO / Fisheries and Aquaculture Policy and Economics Division ; Julie RITZ, UNDESA ; Francis VALLAT, Cluster maritime ; Carla MONTESI, DG MARE for the Baltic and North Sea

 
 
Streams Areas and Sessions (Workshops and Knowledge Cafés)
Governing and financing MPAs
Governance of MPAs in the high seas

Cross sectoral policy dialogue and linking global and Regional Areas Beyond National Juridiction (ABNJ) Processess and Capacity Developement in ABNJ (WS4A2)

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM ; HEMICYCLE MPM

Chairpersons: Biliana CICIN-SAIN, Global Forum on Ocean, Coasts and Islands
 
Contributors: Philippe VALLETTE, NAUSICAA ; Salvatore ARICO, UNESCO ; Roberto DANOVARO, Polytechnic University of Marche, Italy ; Tina FARMER, Food and Agricultural Organization ; Miriam BALGOS, Global Ocean Forum

The marine areas beyond national jurisdiction (ABNJ), which comprise 64% of the ocean’s surface, contain ecosystems with marine resources and biodiversity of great ecological, socioeconomic, and cultural importance. However, marine areas beyond national jurisdiction are facing growing threats from unsustainable resource exploitation, habitat destruction and adverse impacts on biodiversity, and impacts from climate change, among other stressors. As well, new and emerging uses in ABNJ, such as geo-engineering and bio-prospecting, present further potential impacts on marine biodiversity and ecosystems in ABNJ. However, traditional and new uses provide important socio-economic benefits and support the livelihood and sustenance needs of millions around the world. This underscores the need for effective management to ensure that the social and economic benefits of ABNJ are sustainably realized while avoiding adverse impacts on fisheries, biodiversity, and ecosystems.

Despite increasing efforts to improve understanding of these ecosystems and manage their uses sustainably, lack of information on ecosystems and biodiversity, inadequate implementation of existing commitments, limited capacity to effectively manage, and difficulties in enforcement and compliance are impacting the health and sustainability of marine biodiversity in ABNJ, compromising the many benefits and services that they provide to the global community.

This workshop will provide an important opportunity to discuss issues related to ABNJ capacity, including status and trends of oceans in ABNJ, capacity needs related to ABNJ research and management, and ABNJ capacity development initiatives underway. This workshop is being organized by the Global Ocean Forum as part of the GEF/FAO/GOF Project on Strengthening Global Capacity to Effectively Manage ABNJ under the GEF/FAO ABNJ Global Sustainable Fisheries Management and Biodiversity Conservation in Areas Beyond National Jurisdiction Program.

Governance of the high seas: legal issues and regulations (WS4A1)

3:15 PM - 4:45 PM ; NOTRE DAME

Chairpersons: Cristina NARBONA, Global Ocean Commission
 
Contributors: Alicia CRAW, Greenpeace International ; Kristina GJERDE, IUCN ; Dan LAFFOLEY, WCPA Marine ; David JOHNSON, Seascape Consultants ; Kristian TELEKI, Global Ocean Commission ; Linwood PENDLETON, Duke University ; Sofia TSENIKLI, Greenpeace International

A high seas biodiversity agreement, based on the precautionary principle and ecosystem approach, is necessary for the conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity in the global commons. It would provide the mechanism to establish, manage and monitor a global network of MPAs in line with existing global commitments. With commercial interests turning increasingly to the high seas, a biodiversity agreement would also provide a framework for the coordination of uses and activities, including effective monitoring, compliance and enforcement. Ensuring conservation and sustainable management of the oceans must be the backbone of a blue economy on which millions of people depend for their well-being and livelihoods. This session will examine the state of the high seas in terms of management and protection, the current and emerging threats and what policy options are available to support conservation and sustainable management efforts, and ultimately protect the health of the ocean.  The session will be chaired by Global Ocean Commissioner Cristina Narbona (former Minister of Environment, Spain) and will include a panel of internationally recognised experts on the high seas.  The outputs of this session will form a contribution, in addition to IMPAC,  to the Global Ocean Commission's deliberations and inform their discussion on high seas marine protected areas.

 

By the end of this session participants will have a better understanding of:

What are the major threats facing the high seas, and how urgently should they be addressed?

What are the real benefits of large scale MPAs in international waters?

How do we achieve a global solution to this global problem?  Discussion on developing a UN Biodiversity Agreement for the High Seas under UNCLOS.

What are the next steps required to move high seas management and protection forward?

What actors need to be involved, especially those that are not involved at the moment?

 

The structure of the session will be an initial set of short presentations (6 min each) and then followed by an hour of lively, facilitated discussion with the panel and other participants.  The panel members and the areas being discussed are as follows:

Introduction to the session and the Global Ocean Commission focussing on the gap between international governance of the high seas and the urgent need for reform balanced against the reality of threats, and industrial and scientific developments. (GOC Commissioner Cristina Narbona)

The urgent need for high seas management and protection (Dan Laffoley, WCPA Marine)

The current and emerging threat to the high seas  (Alicia Craw, Greenpeace) 

The ecological and economic benefits of large scale protected areas in the high and deep seas (Linwood Pendleton, Duke's Nicholas Institute)

The approach of the International Seabed Authority (David Johnson, GOBI Programme Coordinator)

Progress and prospects for high seas biodiversity conservation  (Kristina Gjerde, IUCN)

Comparing governance frameworks and processes

Participative evaluation of MPA governance systems (KC4B2)

11:45 AM - 1:15 PM ; EUGENIE

Contributors: Mathieu DUCROCQ, International Union for Conservation of Nature ; Jean Yves WEIGEL, IRD

Recent work on shared governance and participatory assessment of MPAs governance systems have highlighted the need for an appropriate methodology. Under the CEPIA project funded by AFD and a cooperation between IUCN, IRD, and SRFC, a contribution to the development of a such methodology is discussed from five West African case studies.

Modalities of a first perception survey are proposed. These concern the particpatory characterization of the governance system following an analytical framework. The five potential components of this framework to be documented are : the adequacy of the stakeholders involved, the compliance of the problem to be addressed by the stakeholders the adequacy of nodal points around which interest sof stakeholders converge or diverge, the evolution of norms guiding behaviours, the effectiveness of processes that governance system is going through. Modalities of a second perception survey are also proposed. These are related to the participatory selection of MPA’s governance indicators and their calculation, which will help to make a diagnosis of the governance system and finally to draw up governance scenarii focused on fisheries. Finally, this discussion will also help to initiate the preparation of a new initiative designed to set up of a regional task force promoting the use of these new tools and analytical frameworks, in order to strengthen the management of West AMP African.

Brightspots lessons learnt - Part 1 (WS4B3A)

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM ; ESTAQUE

Chairpersons: Ronny JUMEAU, GLISPA
 
Contributors: Kate MANNLE, Rare ; Eleanor CARTER, Rare ; Carole MARTINEZ, International Union for Conservation of Nature

Context

Conservation success is built upon initiatives that work – bright spots. These bright spots demonstrate that change is possible. To continue to advance the success of effective MPA’s to meet Aichi target 11 we need to build on what is working and upon those bright spots which have the potential to be scaled and replicated.

This half day knowledge exchange will bring together representatives of government and community to focus on a selection of island, coastal and high seas MPA management bright spots from around the world bright spots. The event will use participatory facilitation techniques to engage participants in discussion around opportunities to help scale innovations to achieve even greater impact. Bright spots tables will focus on:

·         Changing behavior of fishers for MPA compliance

·     Spatial mapping & designing zoning for MPAs

·     Participatory patrol, surveillance & enforcement methods for MPAs

·         Monitoring for management in MPAs.

·         Mobilizing leadership in the Blue Economy

Pre-selected bright spots will be invited to share their work, results achieved, and key elements to success that could be replicated. This session will be of particular interest to MPA managers who are looking for new strategies to apply in their work or who have their own success stories to share, policy makers looking for successful implementation of leadership initiatives, and islanders and island leaders looking to connect. Through facilitated sharing of successes, demonstrated results, and discussion around what made these particular strategies work, key themes across all topic areas will be summarized.

Purpose and Objectives

Objectives

By the end of this session participants will:

1.    Recognize MPA bright spots and leaders from key topic areas

2.    Exchange knowledge with other MPA practitioners and policy-makers from around the world

3.    Outline how MPA bright spots could potentially be scaled upward and outward

Output: 

1.    Documented key discussion points from each world café station

2.    Initial assessment of the potential to scale MPA bright spots

3.    Reflection statements from participants stating what actions they will take related to key topic areas

4.    Video interviews with MPA bright spot leaders on key topic areas that can be shared through a variety of media and platforms (Social networking (Facebook, twitter, RarePlanet, Livewiththesea.org, protectplanetocean.org, Coral Triangle Atlas, Google Oceans and others) 

Brightspots lessons learnt - Part 2 (WS4B3B)

11:45 AM - 1:15 PM ; ESTAQUE

Chairpersons: Ronny JUMEAU, GLISPA
 
Contributors: Kate MANNLE, Rare ; Eleanor CARTER, Rare ; Carole MARTINEZ, International Union for Conservation of Nature

Context

Conservation success is built upon initiatives that work – bright spots. These bright spots demonstrate that change is possible. To continue to advance the success of effective MPA’s to meet Aichi target 11 we need to build on what is working and upon those bright spots which have the potential to be scaled and replicated.

This half day knowledge exchange will bring together representatives of government and community to focus on a selection of island, coastal and high seas MPA management bright spots from around the world bright spots. The event will use participatory facilitation techniques to engage participants in discussion around opportunities to help scale innovations to achieve even greater impact. Bright spots tables will focus on:

·         Changing behavior of fishers for MPA compliance

·     Spatial mapping & designing zoning for MPAs

·     Participatory patrol, surveillance & enforcement methods for MPAs

·         Monitoring for management in MPAs.

·         Mobilizing leadership in the Blue Economy

Pre-selected bright spots will be invited to share their work, results achieved, and key elements to success that could be replicated. This session will be of particular interest to MPA managers who are looking for new strategies to apply in their work or who have their own success stories to share, policy makers looking for successful implementation of leadership initiatives, and islanders and island leaders looking to connect. Through facilitated sharing of successes, demonstrated results, and discussion around what made these particular strategies work, key themes across all topic areas will be summarized.

Purpose and Objectives

Objectives

By the end of this session participants will:

  1. Recognize MPA bright spots and leaders from key topic areas
  2. Exchange knowledge with other MPA practitioners and policy-makers from around the world
  3. Outline how MPA bright spots could potentially be scaled upward and outward

Output: 

  1. Documented key discussion points from each world café station
  2. Initial assessment of the potential to scale MPA bright spots
  3. Reflection statements from participants stating what actions they will take related to key topic areas
  4. Video interviews with MPA bright spot leaders on key topic areas that can be shared through a variety of media and platforms (Social networking (Facebook, twitter, RarePlanet, Livewiththesea.org, protectplanetocean.org, Coral Triangle Atlas, Google Oceans and others) 

Coherence for existing MPAs (WS4B2)

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM ; SAINT-JEAN

Chairpersons: Lauren WENZEL, NOAA ; Charlton CLARK, Parks Australia, Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities
 
Contributors: Geffry SALMON, Minster in charge of Ecology , French Polynesia ; Moustapha CISS, Direction des Aires Marines Communautaires Protégées ; Schaeffer DANIEL, U.S. Coast Guard ; Aichetou SECK, Université cheikh anta Diop de Dakar ; Charles EGRETAUD, Sarl Pae Tai - Pae Uta ; Sophie-Dorothée DURON, Agence des aires marines protégées

A discussion of how management measures can be effectively enforced, in particular in the case of Senegal.

Governance for developing MPA networks (WS4B1)

3:15 PM - 4:45 PM ; SAINT-JEAN

Chairpersons: Marguerite TARZIA, Northern Ireland Marine Task Force ; Souha EL ASMI, RAC/SPA ; Francisco VIDDI, WWF Chile
 
Contributors: Kwang-Tsao SHAO, Biodiversity Research Center, Academia Sinica ; Ronan LONG, MLOPRS Ltd

This workshop aims to compare different MPA governance frameworks from around the world, identifying best practice and potential weaknesses in legislation, and best practice in MPA governance and stakeholder engagement. We will examine whether effective MPA networks can be created in the absence of strong legislation, or whether good stakeholder engagement processes are more important in determining conservation outcomes and long term protection. We will attempt to discuss the potential future issues surrounding MPA network creation, particularly as networks expand across national boundaries and governance frameworks will need to integrate with each other. 

Facilitated Discussion (60 min):  Key Questions

  • Are strong legal frameworks necessary for effective MPA implementation?
  • How important is public/stakeholder participation in MPA implementation compared to legal aspects?
  • How can legislative weaknesses impact on MPA designations and network creation?
  •  How can MPA network of different scales be properly governed and administrated?
  • How are countries, and their legislative/governance frameworks addressing the issue of transboundary network creation? What are some of the likely future issues?
  • Do legal frameworks exist in your country to develop MPA networks? If not, how can MPA be established and effectively managed at your country level?
  • Should a MPA network be established at once? Or would it be better to establish individual MPAs one by one for later and formally creation of networks? Is this legally possible?
  • Did your region/country legislative/governance frameworks address the issue of including areas beyond national jurisdiction into the MPA network/s? What are the main difficulties and how to overcome them?
  • Within networks; how do stakeholders take action and participation compared to that of individual MPAs?
  • Is stakeholder participation compulsory under your country legal framework?
  • How could other legislative frameworks contribute to marine protected areas networks creation/consolidation/extension (fishery reserves, military zones, etc.)?

 

Partnerships, subsidies and funding mechanisms

Tackling the MPA sustainable financing conundrum - Part 1 (WS4C1A)

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM ; LA MAJOR

Chairpersons: John TANZER, WWF International ; Leah KARRER, GEF
 
Contributors: Alasdair HARRIS, Blue Ventures ; Alfredo SIMAO DA SILVA, IBAP : Institut pour la biodiversité et les aires protégées de Guinée Bissau ; Julien CALAS, FFEM ; Clive DESIRE-TESAR, WWF - Global Arctic Program ; Sandro DUJMOVIC, National Park of Brijuni ; Maria Camila PERFETTI, Fondo para la Acción Ambiental y la Niñez ; Sylvie GOYET, FIBA ; Mahmoud CHIHAOUI, APAL ; Marco Vinicio CEREZO, Mar Fund ; Nadia REY, Fundo Patrimonio

In both parts of the workshop, the objectives are to increase understanding of the diversity of sustainable financing instruments available and stimulate increased efforts to leverage funding from governments, donor agencies, and private sector in order to sustain MPAs and MPA networks and reach the Aichi targets of a representative coverage of well managed MPA. Tacking stock of the prerequisites and enabling conditions that must be identified, it will seek to specify how and under what conditions various sustainable finance mechanisms can be used. 

The discussion will build on recently produced studies by the Conservation Finance Alliance and the GEF as well as a range of case studies presented as speed dating workgroup sessions for groups of participants to contribute to. Topics of debate will include Conservation Trust Fund, crowd funding, REDD+ opportunities, ecotourism, etc. . It will mobilize experts from donors and technical agencies to discuss advantages and disadvantages of the different financing options, as well as the conditions that determine the choice of those options.

 

This workshop will provide policy-makers, public finance agencies, and MPA managers with insight on how to optimize the use of various financing support for ensuring long term sustainable financing of MPAs.

Tackling the MPA sustainable financing conundrum - Part 2 (WS4C1B)

11:45 AM - 1:15 PM ; LA MAJOR

Chairpersons: John TANZER, WWF International ; Leah KARRER, GEF
 
Contributors: Alasdair HARRIS, Blue Ventures ; Alfredo SIMAO DA SILVA, IBAP : Institut pour la biodiversité et les aires protégées de Guinée Bissau ; Julien CALAS, FFEM ; Clive DESIRE-TESAR, WWF - Global Arctic Program ; Sandro DUJMOVIC, National Park of Brijuni ; Maria Camila PERFETTI, Fondo para la Acción Ambiental y la Niñez ; Sylvie GOYET, FIBA ; Mahmoud CHIHAOUI, APAL ; Marco Vinicio CEREZO, Mar Fund ; Nadia REY, Fundo Patrimonio

In both parts of the workshop, the objectives are to increase understanding of the diversity of sustainable financing instruments available and stimulate increased efforts to leverage funding from governments, donor agencies, and private sector in order to sustain MPAs and MPA networks and reach the Aichi targets of a representative coverage of well managed MPA. Tacking stock of the prerequisites and enabling conditions that must be identified, it will seek to specify how and under what conditions various sustainable finance mechanisms can be used. 

 

The discussion will build on recently produced studies by the Conservation Finance Alliance and the GEF as well as a range of case studies presented as speed dating workgroup sessions for groups of participants to contribute to. Topics of debate will include Conservation Trust Fund, crowd funding, REDD+ opportunities, ecotourism, etc. . It will mobilize experts from donors and technical agencies to discuss advantages and disadvantages of the different financing options, as well as the conditions that determine the choice of those options.

 

This workshop will provide policy-makers, public finance agencies, and MPA managers with insight on how to optimize the use of various financing support for ensuring long term sustainable financing of MPAs.

MPAs in the wider society
Collaborative methods and tools

Improving participation for better governance of MPAs - Part 1 (WS4D1A)

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM ; GRAND LARGE

Chairpersons: Peter JONES, University College, London ; Katia FRANGOUDES, Brest university ; Jean-Luc SOLANDT, Marine Conservation Society ; Vincent GRAVEZ, Fundación Futuro Latinoamericano
 
Contributors: Vic GILLMAN, Fisheries Joint Management Committee, Western Arctic Region ; Chris THOMAS, Department of Environment, Water and Natural Resources (South Australia) ; Miri TATARATA, Direction de l'environnement ; Adama MBAYE, Centre de recherche Océanographique de Dakar/Thiaroye (CRODT) ; François COLAS, Agence des aires marines protégées

The scope of this workshop is to present some very different regional case studies on the varying governance approaches of nations, individuals, private organisations, regulators and different groups to delivering MPAs and their management. Given the rapid development of MPAs over the last 2-3 decades, and the various targets for delivering MPA networks (2012; 2016 and 2020), how have the varying governance approaches achieved the delivery of conservation objectives?

The goal of the workshop is to consider the varying governance approaches of the different case studies, and frame them into different incentives and governance structures: E.g. achieving conservation objectives; foundations for conservation objectives; top down, bottom up or other governance approaches; combined approaches, and; where incentives can be strengthened. 

Improving participation for better governance of MPAs - Part 2 (WS4D1B)

11:45 AM - 1:15 PM ; GRAND LARGE

Chairpersons: Peter JONES, University College, London ; Katia FRANGOUDES, Brest university ; Jean-Luc SOLANDT, Marine Conservation Society ; Vincent GRAVEZ, Fundación Futuro Latinoamericano
 
Contributors: Matthew ARMSBY, Resources Legacy Fund ; Dominique DUVAL-DIOP, RAMPAO - West African Network of MPAs ; Alf Ring KLEIVEN, Institute of Marine Research, Norway

The scope of this workshop is to present some very different regional case studies on the varying governance approaches of nations, individuals, private organisations, regulators and different groups to delivering MPAs and their management. Given the rapid development of MPAs over the last 2-3 decades, and the various targets for delivering MPA networks (2012; 2016 and 2020), how have the varying governance approaches achieved the delivery of conservation objectives?

The goal of the workshop is to consider the varying governance approaches of the different case studies, and frame them into different incentives and governance structures: E.g. achieving conservation objectives; foundations for conservation objectives; top down, bottom up or other governance approaches; combined approaches, and; where incentives can be strengthened. 

Strenghening local governance and broadening local participation toward achieving Aichi target (WS4D2)

11:45 AM - 1:15 PM ; HEMICYCLE MPM

Chairpersons: Jihyun LEE, Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity ; Thierry FAYRET, Brest Métropole Océane / Maritime Innovative Territories’ International Network (MITIN)
 
Contributors: Christophe LEFEBVRE, Agence des aires marines protégées ; Anne MCDONALD, Sophia University, Japan ; Momar SOW, Ministry of Environment, Senegal ; Thanh TUNG BUI, District of Cat Ba, Haiphong, Vietnam ; Pascale JANNY, Sea and coastal department, city of Marseille

In paragraph 5 of item A (“Subnational governments, cities and other local authorities for biodiversity”) of decision XI/8, Parties to the CBD, development organizations and other donors are invited to support initiatives by networks of local and subnational governments that complement the Plan of Action and contribute directly to Parties’ achievement of the Aichi Biodiversity Targets.

Since 2010, the French local authority, Brest métropole océane, has supported the creation and establishment of a network, the Maritime Innovative Territories International Network (MITIN). Conceived at the Safer Seas conference in May 2011, and officially launched on July 13th 2012, MITIN is an initiative of Brest Science Park (Technopôle Brest Iroise), supported by Brest Métropole Océane and several international partners of the local authority. Today, MITIN gathers 20 maritime territories represented by their technology poles, development and scientific agencies, and local authorities, including the US (San Diego), Mexico (Veracruz), China (Qingdao, Shangaï), Argentina (province du Chubut), Vietnam (Haiphong), Italy (Tarente), UK (Southampton), Portugal (Porto), Spain (Vigo), and Quebec (Rimouski). The network aims at promoting sustainable “blue“ growth and addresses the sustainable use of marine bio-resources, transportation, maritime safety and security, renewable marine sources of energy, marine instrumentation and information technologies.

This event is being convened by Brest metropole oceane (the city government of Brest in connection with the Maritime Innovative Territories International Network, MITIN, see http://www.mitin-network.org/), and the CBD Secretariat in collaboration with various partners, within the context of CBD’s Sustainable Ocean Initiative (http://www.cbd.int/marine/doc/soi-brochure-2012-en.pdf), which provides for global platform for partnerships and capacity development toward achieving Aichi Biodiversity Targets on marine and coastal biodiversity.

The event aims at discussing how CBD’s Sustainable Ocean Initiative will provide an effective framework for local initiatives, such as the Brest Metropole Oceane,  to work together with various global partners in contributing our common goals of implementing the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020 and achieving Aichi Biodiversity Targets, in particular Target 11 on marine protected areas. It will also identify various options of financing such local efforts through the Lifeweb Initiative.

MPAs as forums for stakeholder dialogue

Cleaning the Sea 2050 (KC4E1)

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM ; EUGENIE

Contributors: Marion PEGUIN, UICN France

Presenting an incipient project involving to depollute marine areas, with a focus on both new technologies and on closer integration between the private sector (Veolia) and local authorities.

Blue Society and MPAs (WS4E1)

11:45 AM - 1:15 PM ; MUCEM

Chairpersons: Ludovic FRERE-ESCOFFIER, NAUSICAA ; Philippe VALLETTE, NAUSICAA
 

With a specific focus on MPAs, this workshop proposes a vision of a Blue Society, where civil society, industry and new technology all contribute to a stronger link with the ocean.

Sea For Society, which is financed by the European Commission’s Directorate–General for Research and Innovation, was launched in June 2012 and will run until November 2015. It brings together 27 partners from 11 European countries as well as an Israeli science centre, to develop the Blue Society concept. Sea For Society has two phases, consultation and mobilisation, targeting stakeholders from the worlds of politics and civil society, and also young people. Its goal is to seek innovative ideas for the governance of marine protected areas (MPAs). Based on the results of this consultation, Sea For Society will propose a synthesis report. Sea For Society is a new vision the sea, and of the long-term sustainability of protected areas. It promotes a participative, and thereby innovative approach to stewardship, capable of inspiring others to follow suit.

MPAs as part of Marine Spatial Planning - Part 1 (WS4E3A)

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM ; LACYDON

Chairpersons: Jon DAY, GBRMPA
 
Contributors: Charles EHLER, UNESCO/IOC ; Joanna SMITH, Marine Planning Partnership ; Kimberly FERRAN, Florida Atlantic University

Two workshops aim to identify best Marine Spatial Planning (MSP) practices and tools for MPA planning.

MPAs as part of Marine Spatial Planning - Part 2 (WS4E3B)

11:45 AM - 1:15 PM ; LACYDON

Chairpersons: Andrew DAY, West Coast Aquatic ; Carla MONTESI, DG MARE for the Baltic and North Sea
 
Contributors: Haitze SIEMERS, DG MARE, European Commission ; Kazumi WAKITA, Ocean Policy Foundation ; Ann DOM, Seas at Risk

The objective of this workshop is to explore the political side of MSP and MPA development.

Panellists will compare experiences from different regions of the world on the policy cycle of MSP and MPA. What drives the agenda of MSP? Where is the cursor set between environmental protection and space use by economic activities? Can solutions be exported, like for instance the proposed European framework for MSP and ICM?

After a brief introduction by the chair, panellists should give a short presentation (6-8 minutes) to describe their perspective on the issue.

This will be followed by a discussion (about 30 minutes) around the following lead questions:

-        What is the story of the development of MSP in your region? What is the policy framework and how did the issue come to the policy agenda? In the EU for instance, MSP is part of the concept of a European Integrated Maritime Policy, but in other cases it may be an own-standing policy.

-        How is the concept of MPA understood in your region? Environmental protection or "advanced" co-existence?

-        Who are the main players and interests and how do they interact? What is the support, or main resistance, to the use of MSP and the establishment of MPAs?

-        Is MSP a more effective and efficient process for identifying and protecting ecological values than a separate MPA process?    Do stakeholders prefer that MPAs be identified separately from or through MSP?  How do most stakeholders view MSP:

·         a front for advancing marine protection

·         a front for advancing economic development of marine space

·         a process to balance different values.

-        Would stakeholder engagement in MSP be simplified if MSP processes started with minimum targets or standards for marine conservation (such as minimum % of area designated as MPA)?

-        What is the timing of the policy-making? Are decisions on space use taken in time to have an actual impact?

Finally, at least 15 minutes will be dedicated to questions from the audience.

MPAs for livelihood support

MPAs as a fishery management tool - Part 1 (WS4F1A)

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM ; AMPHITHEATRE AMU

Chairpersons: Serge Michel GARCIA, IUCN - FEG
 
Contributors: Jean-Michel CULIOLI, Office d’Environnement de la Corse (France) ; Frédérique ALBAN, Projet Amure, Université de Bretagne Occidentale (UBO) (France) ; Tearii ALPHA, Government of French Polynesia ; Amie BRÄUTIGAM, Wildlife Conservation Society (USA) ; Pilar HERNÁNDEZ, GFCM ; Aurora NASTASI, GFCM ; Amy BRÄUTIGAM, Wildlife Conservation Society (USA) ; Hany EL SHAER, IUCN-med ; Ovando DAN, University of California, Santa Barbara

Three workshops discuss the role of MPAs as a fishery management tool from multiple perspectives. Here we try to answers to address the following issues :

-          What are good conservation and fisheries management outcomes, respectively? What are the trade-offs?

-          In what situations can MPAs be a useful fisheries management tool?

-          Under what conditions can multiple objectives be achieved (what type of governance and institutional arrangements are likely to be needed)? What are the roles of marine spatial planning, ICAM etc?

WS4F1AHow can MPAs have positive outcomes both for conservation and fisheries management?

MPAs as a fishery management tool - Part 2 (WS4F1B)

11:45 AM - 1:15 PM ; AMPHITHEATRE AMU

Chairpersons: Jessica SANDERS, FAO / Fisheries and Aquaculture Policy and Economics Division
 
Contributors: Nathan BENNETT, University of British Columbia / / BOBLME ; Hans J. HARTMANN, Université de La Rochelle ; Luc FARGIER, Université de la Rochelle ; Alain JEUDY DE GRISSAC, International Union for Conservation of Nature ; Fidison MINIMINY, Plateforme de Concertation pour le Développement Durable de la Baie d’Antongil, Madagascar ; Johanna HERFAUT, Agence des aires marines protégées ; Sidina EBAYE, Parc National du Banc d'Arguin

Three workshops discuss the role of MPAs as a fishery management tool from multiple perspectives. Here we try to answers to address the following issues :

-          Why do (small-scale) fishing communities sometimes/often find MPAs problematic and how can this situation be addressed?

-          What best practices and approaches are there for planning, designating and managing an MPA in a participatory manner?

-          What are the key challenges in co-management and how can they be overcome?

WS4F1B: How can stakeholder participation be ensured and what are the conditions for successful co-management?

MPAs as a fishery management tool - Part 3 (WS4F1C)

3:15 PM - 4:45 PM ; AMPHITHEATRE AMU

Chairpersons: Sukarno bin WAGIMAN, Bay of Bengal Large Marine Ecosystem project (BOBLME) / Department of Marine Parks, Malaysia
 
Contributors: Philip DEARDEN, University of Victoria (Canada / BOBLME ; Didier GASCUEL, Agrocampus-Rennes ; Amanda LEJBOWICZ, Comunidad y Bioversidad (COBI), Mexico ; Naseegh JAFFER, World Forum of Fisher Peoples (WFFP) ; Stefan ASMUNDSSON, NEAFC ; Aylem HERNÁNDEZ, AVILA, REDPARQUES (Cuba)

Three workshops discuss the role of MPAs as a fishery management tool from multiple perspectives. In this final panel discussion, we try to answers to make recommendations for actions to governments, international organisations, academia, NGOs and civil society organisations (CSOs) / fishing communities to use MPA as a fishery management tool.

WS4F1CWhat is the way forward – how should different actors address challenges and seize opportunities to promote MPAs with multiple objectives?

Communicating around MPAs

Securing broader recognition of the value of coral reefs (KC4G2)

3:15 PM - 4:45 PM ; EUGENIE

Contributors: Ophélie DARSES, MEDDE ; Nicolas PASCAL, CRIOBE

The economic valuation of coral reefs ecosystem services is currently seen as a promising approach to demonstrate the benefits of sustainable management of coral ecosystems to policymakers and to provide useful information for improved decisions. Many coral reefs economic studies have been conducted mainly in the United States, Southeast Asia and the Caribbean.  Since 2010, the French Initiative for Coral Reefs (IFRECOR) has been conducting  economic valuations of coastal ecosystem services (and MPAs in some cases) in all the French oversea territorries (French Polynesia, New Caledonia, Wallis and Futuna, Mayotte, La Réunion, Martinique, Guadeloupe, St Martin and St Barthelemy). 

The objectives of the Knowledge Cafe are to discuss about (i) challenges of conducting valuations and (ii) improve their impacts on decision-making:

 (i) We will share briefly the results of the valuations and focus on a clear understanding of the beneficiaries of the 3 main coral reef ecosystem services (fisheries, underwater turism and coastal protection against flood and erosion). We will then present the main challenges faced in conducting these studies (methodological and empirical e.g. non use valuation, spatial distribution, sustainable levels). 


(ii) From a brief presentation of the valuations and their impacts on policy-making, we wish to open a dicussion about the role of total economic valuation of ecosystem services and cost-benefit analysis of MPA for coral reef management. More specifically, the match between economic studies and on-the-field policy questions will be questionned. In the same way, strategies to transmit the information of economic importance of coral reef to decision-makers and budget-makers will be shared.

Securing large, fully protected marine reserves: Coral Sea (KC4G3)

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM ; EUGENIE

Contributors: Jean-Paul MICHEL, Pew ; Robert MAZUREK, The Pew Charitable Trusts

An introduction to the Pew Global Ocean Legacy through the example of the Coral Sea Project.

Understanding climate change to improve MPA management (KC4G1)

3:15 PM - 4:45 PM ; EUGENIE

Contributors: Karsten SHEIN, NOAA National Climatic Data Center

How expert systems can harness science and knowledge on climate change in the service of MPA management.

Underwater trails: an effective communication tool for coastal MPAs in the Mediterranean (KC4G4)

11:45 AM - 1:15 PM ; EUGENIE

Contributors: Catherine PIANTE, WWF-France

Out of the tools that contribute to educating and raising public awareness of the environment in MPAs, "underwater trails" have swiftly gained recognition as practical and effective, embodying the concept of sustainable development. This knowledge café aims at introducing the concept and design of underwater trails. Following a general introduction, 2 case studies from France will be presented and discussed. All the steps of the actual creation of an underwater trail, from choosing the site through to organisation, necessary resources and cost, will be covered. At the endof the Knowledge Cafe, the Underwater Trail Handbook will be handed out to participants. 

Raising awareness of the role of MPAs in ocean conservation and sustainable development (WS4G1)

3:15 PM - 4:45 PM ; GRAND LARGE

Chairpersons: Sabine JESSEN, Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society ; Luba MYCIO MOMMERS, Canadian Wildlife Federation
 
Contributors: Jean-François SYS, IUCN / ville de Marseille ; Sean BRILLANT, Canadian Wildlife Federation ; Thierry LEFEBVRE, Comité français de l'UICN ; Randolph SMITH, SWA ; Fiona LLEWELLYN, Marine Reserves Coalition, Zoological Society of London

This workshop seeks to present a lively discussion with the goal of advancing capacity building for actions that can help to raise awareness of the role of MPAs in ocean conservation and sustainable development.  Toward that end, a team of diverse and enthusiastic presenters will present various perspectives around various topics ranging from increasing public awareness and support for MPAs through a partnership between the conservation and outdoor retail sectors, the need and benefits of MPAs, reaching users of marine environments through effective communication strategies and personal testimonials for the conservation of marine resources.

This workshop session will shape discussion and recommendations around five key questions:

1-What are the key challenges in communication about MPAs?

2-What approaches contribute toward meeting these challenges among the media and the public?   How do we know?

3- What kind of messages help shape positive support for MPAs?

4-What factors help contribute toward working successfully with partners and other allies?

5-What lessons we can learn from successes stories that can help reduce misconceptions about MPAs?

Stakeholder and community involvement
Shifting towards more participation and consultation

Collaborative MPA Implementation (KC4H1)

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM ; EUGENIE

Contributors: Matthew ARMSBY, Resources Law Group

After establishing a science-based network of 124 marine protected areas, the State of California is turning to planning for good governance and effective implementation. State officials are looking to governmental and non-governmental partners – including universities, citizen groups, businesses, and philanthropic foundations – to assist with compliance, monitoring, outreach, and education. The partners will work together to ensure the MPAs protect marine ecosystems, provide recreational and educational opportunities, and provide for improved understanding of the marine environment. Using California as a launching point for discussion, this session will explore: (1) lessons learned from collaborative efforts to govern and manage of MPA networks; (2) lessons learned from public-private partnerships; and (3) implications for community participation and engagement with tribal communities.

Bottom-up versus top-down approaches to MPAs (WS4H1)

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM ; JOLIETTE

Chairpersons: Carlos F. GAYMER, Universidad Católica del Norte, CEAZA, IEB
 
Contributors: Louise LIEBERKNECHT, University College London ; Philippe TOUS, Océanic Développement ; Eleanor CARTER, Rare ; Ernie GLADSTONE, Parks Canada

The workshop aims a good balance between study case presentations and broad discussion. For this, it will be divided in:

1.- Introduction to workshop session and panelists (5 min) by a lead facilitator. This would briefly introduce the overarching theme of the session (stakeholder and community involvement – shifting towards more participation and consultation) as outlined in the WS4H1 description, and the emphasis on “Bottom-up versus top-down approaches to MPAs”; and briefly introduce all of the panel participants.

2.- Speed-presentation round by the 7 panelists (5 min each, with PPTs) (Total 40 min, including transition time between speakers). No Q&As.

3.- Panel discussion promoted by the facilitator. Exact format remains to be determined (20 min).

4.- Open discussion to the audience (20 min).

5.- Wrap up and take home message by the facilitator (5 min).

The objective of the workshop is discussing, on the basis of seven experiences from different world regions, how top-down and bottom-up processes have dominated different cases of MPA creation and management, the need for a good balance between both approaches and what can be suggested to increase the chances of success of MPAs.

CONCLUSIONS AIMED

-          Suggestions on how reaching a good balance between top-down and bottom-up approaches.

-          Insights on how (mechanisms) and how much can we involve local communities on MPA creation and management.

-          Particularities when working with indigenous communities.

-          Lessons learnt from unsuccessful experiences.

-          Insights on the appropriate scale (local, regional) to guarantee stakeholders involvement in MPA development.

Insights on how scientific information may help both bottom-up and top-down processes.

Global Partnership for Oceans: Protecting and restoring (WS4H2)

3:15 PM - 4:45 PM ; LA MAJOR

Chairpersons: Lynne HALE, The Nature Conservancy
 
Contributors: David OBURA, CORDIO East Africa ; Leah KARRER, GEF ; Agus DERMAWAN, Ministry of marine Affairs and Fisheries , Republic of Indonesia ; Daniel BASTA, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) ; William KOSTKA, Micronesia Conservation Trust, Federated States of Micronesia

The Global Partnership for Oceans, with more than 100 nations, corporations, public sector agencies, multilateral organizations and civil society organizations, was formed in 2012 to encourage cooperation and increased investment in proven solutions to the world's ocean problems.  A GPO Habitat Open Community of Practice was established in 2013 to develop an agenda for action to meet the 2020 GPO objectives :  to halve the rate of natural habitat loss and reduce degradation and fragmentation by applying ecosystem-based approaches to management; Increase marine managed and protected areas, and other effective area-based conservation measures, to include at least 10 percent of coastal and marine areas; and Conserve and restore natural coastal habitats to reduce vulnerability and increase resilience to climate change impacts.

Following a short presentation of the Agenda for Action, a moderated panel dialogue with members from government, civil society, practionners, and the donor community will be invited to share their thoughts and ideas on priorities for addressing the implementation gap between global commitments and action, and their perspective on how the Global Partnership on Oceans (GPO) proposed Agenda for Action reflects their needs, challenges, and opportunities.  The session will draw on participants’ experience and knowledge, generate ideas for catalytic actions and opportunities to make a difference in the shorter and longer term, and articulate key messages and a common vision for the future to advance the GPO objective of healthy and productive oceans.

The panel will conclude with recommendations on a way forward to inform the deliberations of the high level ministerial meeting to be held on 26th October in Corsica following the IMPAC3. 

Governance for MPA design (WS4H3)

3:15 PM - 4:45 PM ; JOLIETTE

Chairpersons: Jon DAVIES, Joint Nature Conservation Committee ; Sue WELLS, Natural England
 
Contributors: Emmanuel BULOT, Agence des aires marines protégées ; Charlotte MICHEL, Usages et territoires ; Leïla HAVARD, Laboratoire Géomer Université Bretagne Occidentale (France) ; Melinda AGAPITO, Memorial University of Newfoundland ; Vreni HäUSSERMANN, Huinay Scientific Field Station, Pontificia Universidad Catolica Valparaiso ; Xavier HARLAY, Agence des aires marines protégées

OBJECTIVE OF THE WORKSHOP

Although the benefits of stakeholder involvement in MPA management are well understood and an extensive body of experience has developed, the role of stakeholders in planning and developing recommendations for MPAs is less well understood. Using examples from 6 countries (Mexico, Chile, Senegal, France, England and Canada), the workshop will identify the benefits and challenges of involving stakeholders from the very beginning of the MPA planning process, and discuss methods and approaches for achieving this.  The workshop will undertake a preliminary analysis of progress made to date and identify initial lessons learned.

 

EXPECTED OUTCOMES OF WORKSHOP

$1-          List of benefits of involving stakeholders from the beginning of the planning process.

$1-          Identification of challenges involved in such an approach, with recommendations for addressing these.

$1-          Understanding of which stakeholders should be involved, the roles they are best suited to and how they can be helped to participate most effectively.

$1-          Indications of methods and approaches that could be used and any constraints associated with them

Locally Managed Marine Areas (LMMAs)

Marine areas managed by local communities on a participative basis - Part 1 (WS4I1A)

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM ; NOTRE DAME

Chairpersons: Rili DJOHANI, Coral Triangle Center
 
Contributors: Hugh GOVAN, Foundation of the People of the South Pacific - International ; Guilherme DUTRA, Conservation International Brazil ; Sylvia RITOSSA, International Union for Conservation of Nature ; Avra HELLER, CNMI Division of Environmental Quality ; Elizabeth MATTHEWS, World Conservation Society ; Salatou SAMBOU, président de l'association des pêcheurs de Kawawana (Sénégal)

This session brings together community members, practitioners and policy makers from around the globe to discuss the successes, challenges and opportunities which face local managers and those who support them in achieving maximum impact for sustainable livelihoods and conservation. 

Representatives of the vast diversity of local management experiences as well as all interested participants will share a limited number of short presentations on the key issues based on current practices to initiate plenary and group discussions on the challenges and opportunities presented by local management, what might be and how to determine best practices and how best to maximize its potential.

Topics will include the balance between fisheries management and conservation impacts, achieving national or large scale systems and impacts, financial sustainability and the role of government, ensuring linkages between community and national decision-makers and ensuring how less visible stakeholders participate and benefit. Participants will conclude with recommendations including on priority ways forward.

 

Marine areas managed by local communities on a participative basis - Part 2 (WS4I1B)

11:45 AM - 1:15 PM ; NOTRE DAME

Chairpersons: Hugh GOVAN, Foundation of the People of the South Pacific - International ; Avra HELLER, CNMI Division of Environmental Quality
 
Contributors: Guilherme DUTRA, Conservation International Brazil ; Sylvia RITOSSA, International Union for Conservation of Nature ; Rili DJOHANI, Coral Triangle Center ; Salatou SAMBOU, Président de l'association des pêcheurs de Kawawana (Sénégal) ; Elizabeth MATTHEWS, World Conservation Society

Two workshops provide feedback on existing LMMAs, discuss issues and propose further action, including the development of best-practices guidelines usable by client communities.

Working with industry

Walking the blue carpet: Fish meet fashion (KC4J1)

11:45 AM - 1:15 PM ; EUGENIE

Contributors: Heather KOLDEWEY, Zoological Society of London

An insight into innovative ways of engaging industries (and consumers) in marine protection: how the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) is partnering with leading retailers and manufacturers.

Working with big industries to conserve ecosystem services (WS4J1)

11:45 AM - 1:15 PM ; JOLIETTE

Chairpersons: Paul GAMBLIN, WWF-Australia
 
Contributors: Johanna POLSENBERG, Wildlife Conservation Society ; Amélie BOUÉ, Ligue pour la Protection des Oiseaux ; Martin CALLOW, Wildlife Conservation Society ; Elodie HATE, La Compagnie du Vent

Various marine industries are expanding their operational ‘footprint’ in areas of high value for biodiversity and food security/livelihoods, including around existing or potential MPAs.  This trend coincides with the recognition that the pace of MPA development needs to be accelerated significantly, both regionally and globally, to meet international, science-based targets.

In many areas, existing and prospective industry interests are a major consideration in MPA development and management.  This throws up many challenges, but can also create opportunities. In this workshop, three case studies will be presented from different regions and for different industry sectors.  These will help to draw attention to approaches that attempt to map industry and conservation interests, and explore the conditions necessary to reconcile sectoral goals, including by reducing environmental impacts and risks, and encouraging long-term stewardship by industry.

Drawing both on conceptual approaches and real experience, the workshop will seek to focus on key, practical themes and outputs to help MPA practitioners and industry find common ground.

25 October

Regional Approaches

Regional approaches to MPAs and MPA networks are complex and sensitive due to the diversity of existing and evolving players, programs, networks and initiatives – a diversity which constitutes a coordination challenge but also and a strength. Day 5 will consider how regional approaches must both take into account and contribute to global MPA targets, catalyzing synergies to achieve them through coherent, well managed and efficient networks. Discussions will have a strong cross-border focus.

 Program Day 5 (PDF) 

WS Codes beginning with WS are Workshops.
KC Codes beginning with KC are Knowledge Cafés.
PA Codes beginning with PA are Ocean+ Pavilion Presentations.

This Program is subject to last-minute changes.

 

PLENARY SESSIONS

Introductive plenary session (PL51) (8:45 AM - 9:45 AM) - AUDITORIUM

Moderators:
Carole MARTINEZ, International Union for Conservation of Nature ; David JOHNSON, Seascape Consultants
Speakers:

Kristina GJERDE, IUCN ; Hugh GOVAN, Foundation of the People of the South Pacific - International ; Ronny JUMEAU, GLISPA ; Bruce JEFFRIES, SPREP

 

Midday Plenary debate (PL52) (2:30 PM - 3:00 PM) - AUDITORIUM

Moderators:
Carl Gustaf LUNDIN, International Union for Conservation of Nature
Speakers:

Daniel WAGNER, Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument ; Estienne RODARY, Institut de recherche pour le développement (IRD) ; John DAVIS, MPA news

Local to Regional Management – Does Size Matter? 

 

Conclusive plenary session (PL53) (3:00 PM - 4:00 PM) - AUDITORIUM

Moderators:
Carole MARTINEZ, International Union for Conservation of Nature ; David JOHNSON, Seascape Consultants
Speakers:

Purificacio CANALS , MedPAN ; Seastian TROENG, Conservation International ; Maria Lusia SILVA MEJIAS, UNEP MAP, convention de Barcelone

 

IMPAC3 Conclusive plenary session (PL54) (4:00 PM - 5:00 PM) - AUDITORIUM

Chairperson:
Julia Marton LEFEVRE, International Union for Conservation of Nature

 

Convention on Biological Diversity

World Bank

Global Ocean Commission

French Ministry for Environment 

 

 
 
Streams Areas and Sessions (Workshops and Knowledge Cafés)
Crossing boundaries and fostering regional synergies
Ensuring ecologically coherent regional networks

Ecoregional analysis (KC5A1)

11:45 AM - 1:15 PM ; EUGENIE

Contributors: Chloé WEBSTER, MedPAN ; Amandine EYNAUDI, Agence des aires marines protégées ; Brian MACSHARRY, UNEP WCMC ; Emily CORCORAN, OSPAR Commission

How regional networks of MPAs based on ecosystem representativity analysis may improve conservation coherence and support reaching Aichi Target 11

 The knowledge café KC51A aims to focus on technical aspects, namely for designing & using regional databases on MPAs, to improve analysis of systems of MPAs and encourage conservation coherence in light of Aichi Target 11.

Participants will work on a comparative analysis of the MPA databases that exist for two regional seas, the Mediterranean (MAPAMED) & North-East Atlantic (for the Atlantic Arc) which have been developed so to be in line with the CDDA (EU) and WDPA (WCMC) databases. For future analysis of the coherence of existing systems of MPAs, adequately recording data, streamlining the methods and pinpointing gaps in knowledge, an efficient tool is a must. 

Following the movement : Regional networks and migratory species (WS5A2)

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM ; AUDITORIUM

Chairpersons: Vincent RIDOUX, University La Rochelle ; Amandine EYNAUDI, Agence des aires marines protégées
 
Contributors: Léa DAVID , GIS3M ; Marion BRICHET, Agence des aires marines protégées ; Alain GIBUDI , PROTOMAC ; Hélène SOUAN, CAR-SPAW

Through the course of the workshop ‘Following the Movement’ many issues surrounding the suitability, effectiveness, design and implementation of MPA networks will be investigated which effectively represent the requirements of wide-ranging species. The aim of the workshop is to highlight issues such as accounting for species movements; transboundary conservation; meeting ecological coherence; and the need to combine several approaches to adequately meet requirements. This will be achieved from a select number of ‘springboard’ talks, drawing on regional experiences (Objective 1), and then through guided discussions on questions arising from shared points between speakers and participants (Objective 2)

Instruments and actions in the European waters (WS5A3)

11:45 AM - 1:15 PM ; AUDITORIUM

Chairpersons: Hanna PAULOMAKI, Océana ; Henning VON NORDHEIM, German Federal Agency for Nature Conservation
 
Contributors: Emily CORCORAN, OSPAR ; Johnny REKER, European Environment Agency ; Marija SCIBERRAS, Marine Institute, University of Plymouth ; Jean-Pierre FERAL, CNRS ; Jochen KRAUSE, BfN

The workshop will discuss how well existing MPAs are meeting criteria of ecological coherence and identify future work necessary to address gaps in the network at the European regional scale. Discussions will focus on describing the next necessary steps to develop a coherent European MPA network. Speakers will address the topic in the frame of the existing EU legislation and the regional seas conventions. The discussion should focus on describing the necessary steps from where we stand today to develop a European representative and coherent MPA network by the combined effort of all European Member States. We should focus on criteria to identify the next quantitative steps – i.e. where to add which areas and by what qualitative steps, i.e. the improvement of objectives and measures of existing MPAs (e.g. Natura 2000 sites).

Towards ecologically representative and well connected regional networks - Part 1 (WS5A1B)

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM ; MUCEM

Chairpersons: Ole VESTERGAARD, UNEP DEPI-Marine Ecosystem Unit ; Anne-Gaëlle VERDIER, WWF-France
 
Contributors: Neil ALLONCLE, AAMP ; Sophie ARNAUD-HAOND, Ifremer ; Erwann LAGABRIELLE, Institut de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD) ; Anne LITTAYE, Agence des aires marines protégées ; Ana Gloria GUZMAN, Conservation International ; Steve SCHILL, The Nature Conservancy ; Estelle CROCHELET, Institut de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD) ; Marco ANDRELLO, Institut de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD)

The ocean is a highly mobile environment and the integration of ecological connectivity within MPA management is a multi-disciplinary and multi-scale challenge. Connectivity designates a wide range of biological flows, from passive larvae dispersal to cetacean migrations, The communications selected in this workshop will present regional connectivity studies developed.in the world’s oceans, We asked each presenter to answer three key questions of global relevance: 1) How connectivity studies can contribute to MPAs networks management? 2) How this knowledge should be communicated to MPAs managers ? Finally,  3) we asked each contributor to propose their long-term vision for the future of connectivity  studies and their integration within MPAs planning and management. The communication format is short (5 minutes per presentation) and aims to favor interactivity among presenters and the public. The output of the workshop will be a set of recommendations to foster interactions between scientists and managers toward a better integration of ecological  connectivity within MPAs management. Throughout this workshop, we aim at reviewing with IMPAC3 participants best approaches and tools to design representative and well connected regional MPAs networks. Workshop conclusions will be transmitted to high level decision makers including participants to the Ajaccio Ministerial Conference for Ocean Conservation.

Towards ecologically representative and well connected regional networks - Part 2 (WS5A1A)

11:45 AM - 1:15 PM ; MUCEM

Chairpersons: Erwann LAGABRIELLE, Institut de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD) ; Ole VESTERGAARD, UNEP DEPI-Marine Ecosystem Unit ; Anne LITTAYE, Agence des aires marines protégées
 
Contributors: Anne-Gaëlle VERDIER, WWF-France ; Catherine GABRIE, Consultante en environnement marin et littoral ; Paul Silaï TENDENG, RAMPAO ; Souha EL ASMI, RAC/SPA ; Florence PALLA, Réseau des AP Afrique Centrale

Regional MPA networks initiatives are being undertaken in the world’s oceans. They aim to conserve a representative sample of region’s biodiversity, while minimizing threats and guarantying the continuity of ecological processes that generate biodiversity. The communications selected in this workshop will present regional MPA networks initiatives developed in the Caribbean and Mediterranean Sea and in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Ocean. Beyond regional conclusions, we asked each contributor to address three key questions: 1) What are the benefits (and limitations) of developing regional MPAs networks? 2) What are the most efficient mechanisms to implement those regional plans, in the broader framework of marine spatial planning? Finally, 3) we asked each contributor to propose their long-term vision for the future of marine spatial planning. The communication format is short (5 minutes per presentation) and aims to favor interactivity among presenters and the public. The output of the workshop will be a set of practical recommendations toward a better integration of MPA networks within regional marine spatial planning initiatives. Throughout this workshop, we aim at reviewing with IMPAC3 participants best approaches and tools to design representative and well connected regional MPAs networks. Workshop conclusions will be transmitted to high level decision makers including participants to the Ajaccio Ministerial Conference for Ocean Conservation.

Developing interregional cooperation

Inspiring Solutions for Developing Capacity (KC5B1)

11:45 AM - 1:15 PM ; EUGENIE

Contributors: Nick COX, IUCN

Objective: To identify capacity building priorities that will inspire better decisions and improve management of marine protected areas.

Session Outline: Capacity building needs for MPAs are almost infinite, and capacity initiatives will probably never be sustainable. This Knowledge Café provides an opportunity for participants to share common experiences, and aims to identify the key obstacles to effectively building capacity. Specifically we would like to prioritise those a small number of urgent actions that will achieve the greatest and most immediate impact for long term conservation gain. We will also debate who are the right decision makers we need to target, and what are the best ways to ensure decision makers get the knowledge and information they need to make the right decisions for the best possible outcomes for MPAs.

 

Expected outputs:

 

  •          A summary of a small number of key obstacles for capacity initiatives to address
  •          A better understanding of who are the key decision makers and what are the strategies for getting the right information in their hands
  •          Experience exchange and networking from across the world’s marine environment
  •          Better understanding of the BIOPAMA programme’s role and how regions can participate

 

Bilateral cooperation: Cross fertilizing minds and developing joint actions (WS5B2)

11:45 AM - 1:15 PM ; NOTRE DAME

Chairpersons: Anne-Claire GOARANT, Service de la coopération régionale et des relations extérieures du Gouvernement de la Nouvelle-Calédonie ; Régis ETAIX-BONNIN, Service de la pêche et de l'environnement marin, Direction des affaires maritimes de la Nouvelle-Calédonie
 
Contributors: Inseo HWANG, Korea Marine Environment Management Corporation(KOEM) ; Marianne LAUDATO, Office de l’Environnement de la Corse ; Gianluigi CANCEMI, Office de l'Environnement de la Corse

This joint workshop will underline the importance of bilateral cooperation in regional networks and fostering regional approach of marine issues.

The international context supports regional dynamics. The Rio+20 conference took meaningful engagements in international governance for ocean management (definition of international rules for high-sea).

Building bilateral cooperation related to marine issue is building “human” networks which can support marine conservation through exchanges and agreement. The aim is to look further than the national frontiers, to work on local issues and built an ocean’s gouvernance.

Through 3 short presentations, the workshop will bring out the main success and difficulties of bilateral cooperation.  Key question will be expressed and discussed with the audience trough little group to allow the emergence of key recommendations to improve the effectiveness of regional cooperation.

Objectives of the workshop

·         Share experience of bilateral cooperation

·         Learn from each other different way to overcome difficulties of bilateral cooperation

·         Show the success, relevance and effectiveness of bilateral cooperation

·         Encourage the IMPAC high-level segment participant to engage themselves in bilateral cooperation with the support of multilateral organization.

From the Arctic to the Antarctic (WS5B3)

11:45 AM - 1:15 PM ; JOLIETTE

Chairpersons: Martha MCCONNELL, IUCN - Polar Programme
 
Contributors: Paul GAMBLIN, WWF-Australia ; Daniel BEAVER, Centre For Conservation Geography ; Romain TROUBLE, Tara Expedition

Ocean warming combined with increasing ocean acidification, ice changes, and human activities such as fishing, shipping, and tourism are putting immense pressure on the polar marine and coastal environment. Establishing a robust, integrated network of protected areas is one important way to help preserve ecosystem function and enhance resilience in the polar marine environment as it faces these changes.  This workshop will provide a forum for joint learning on recent efforts to establish marine reserves in the Southern Ocean, how that progress might be applied to the Arctic, and explore options for cooperation among Arctic and Antarctic States to create a representative, ecologically connected network of protected areas.  The event will also connect with the ongoing Tara Expedition to share their journey as they circumnavigate the Arctic Ocean

Regional MPA networks: Their contribution towards achieving the Aïchi targets (WS5B1)

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM ; ESTAQUE

Chairpersons: Purificacio CANALS , MedPAN ; Leah KARRER, GEF
 
Contributors: Georgina BUSTAMANTE, Caribbean Marine Protected Area Management Network and Forum (CaMPAM) ; Marie ROMANI, MedPAN ; Charlotte GOBIN, Global Environment Facility ; Dominique DUVAL-DIOP, RAMPAO - West African Network of MPAs

The workshop aims to emphasize the importance of regional networks of MPA managers to achieve the Aïchi targets. These “human” networks can support the development of ecological network of MPAs that answers to the 10% target of MPAs in Regional Seas. They can also contribute to improve the management effectivenessof existing MPAs through capacity building and exchanges. Finally they have to play a key role in mainstreaming environment into development activities and advocating for governance at multiple levels in multiple sectors and in multiple cultures.

Through 3 different panel discussions, the workshop will stimulate exchange and dialogue among several regional networks of MPA managers around the world and will reinforce collaboration with larger frameworks and key stakeholders beyond MPAs.

Finally, a set of key recommendations will be drafted to improve the effectiveness of regional networks of MPA managers and to better integrate them in broader framework of integrated management.

Integrating the high seas into regional networks

Regional approaches of MPAs in ABNJs - Part 1 (WS5C1B)

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM ; LA MAJOR

Chairpersons: Patrick HALPIN, Marine Geospatial Ecology Lab, Duke University, USA
 
Contributors: Piers DUNSTAN, CSIRO, Australia ; Jihyun LEE, Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity ; Jeff ARDRON, Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies, Germany

In 2008, the Convention on Biodiversity (CBD) adopted seven criteria to identify ecologically or biologically significant areas(EBSAs) “in need of protection, in open ocean waters and deep sea habitats”. This workshop reviews the progress so far in the regionally-driven EBSA process, and discusses what EBSAs might evolve towards. Although EBSA development was originally driven by the commitment to establish marine protected areas in areas beyond national jurisdiction, it has since broadened to encompass the possibility of informing marine spatial planning and other activities, both within and beyond national jurisdiction. The overlap between the EBSA criteria and biodiversity criteria suites used by various authorities suggests that they could become a ‘common currency’ amongst high seas and regional governance institutions. The EBSA process has reached a critical juncture, whereby almost 200 EBSAs have been described, and a large percentage of the global ocean has now been considered by the regional workshops. However, the procedure by which these areas can be incorporated into formal management structures has not yet been fully developed and is still under discussion. This workshop will explore lessons learnt, and how EBSAs can next be incorporated into ecosystem-based decision-making. 

Regional approaches of MPAs in ABNJs - Part 2 (WS5C1A)

11:45 AM - 1:15 PM ; LA MAJOR

Chairpersons: Kristina GJERDE, IUCN
 
Contributors: Julien ROCHETTE, Iddri ; Elisabeth DRUEL, Institute for Sustainable Development and International Relations (IDDRI) ; David JOHNSON, Seascape Consultants Ltd ; Hannah THOMAS, United Nations Environment Programme - World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC)

In marine areas beyond national jurisdiction (ABNJ) — the high seas and the deep seabed located beyond the limits of States’ continental shelves — biodiversity is at significant risk. Covering almost two-thirds of the global ocean, ABNJ represent the largest biome in the global ocean, and indeed on Earth. In 2010, the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity agreed that a network of marine protected areas (MPAs) covering 10% of the oceans should be established by 2020. However, establishing MPAs in ABNJ remains a challenge, for legal and governance reasons in particular. Initial promising steps have recently been made at regional level – through the OSPAR Convention for the Protection of Marine Environment of the North-East Atlantic, the Barcelona Convention for the Protection of the Marine Environment and Coastal Region of the Mediterranean and the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Living Marine Resources (CCAMLR). These initiatives will provide experience and inspiration for other regional initiatives in ABNJ but they also face challenges with regard to cooperation in management, compliance and enforcement. In that sense, they also illustrate the potential benefits of developing a new, global legal agreement specifically dedicated to ABNJ. This workshop will therefore aim at analysing the current situation and explore possible directions for developing and strengthening the regional approach in ABNJ. 

Advancing regional networks and their governance
Leveraging regional strategies

Protection of Coral Reef : the importance of Regional Cooperation (KC5D2)

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM ; EUGENIE

Contributors: Anne CAILLAUD, International Coral Reef Initiative

Regional & sub-regional experiences - Panel 1 (WS5D1A)

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM ; GRAND LARGE

Chairpersons: David JOHNSON, Seascape Consultants
 
Contributors: Henning VON NORDHEIM, Bundesamt für Naturschutz ; Anne WALTON, NOAA/ONMS ; Janica BORG, Helcom ; Ginny FARMER, Conservation International ; Juan Ivan SANCHEZ

This session showcases five well-established initiatives from different parts of the world representing leading initiatives at the regional level. It highlights how these different regions have harnessed collaboration and how regional frameworks have the potential to better coordinate management effectiveness.

The aim of the session is to identify where cross-fertilization of approaches and strategies can inform governance and make a difference in future. In a series of individual presentations each case will therefore counter-balance details of their successes in coordinating MPA coverage with information on challenges now being addressed.

The eclectic nature of this session merits slightly longer individual presentations. Each initiative will be allocated time to showcase their work, with an opportunity for each presenter to answer one or two questions for clarification. The presentations will take us on a journey from from East to West.

Objectives of the workshop

The objective of this Workshop is to share MPA network experiences from regions around the world. Individual regions represented in this session are at different stages of development but each can claim successes. The presenters are keen to explore implications of institutional structure, how best to communicate advantages of cooperation and measures of regional management effectiveness. The Workshop is aiming to conclude that regional networks provide added value with opportunities to achieve better representative MPA coverage.

Regional & sub-regional experiences - Panel 2 (WS5D1B)

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM ; SAINT-JEAN

Chairpersons: Charlotte KARIBUHOYE, FIBA ; Catherine GABRIé
 
Contributors: Veronica CIRELLI, Fundacion Vida Silvestre Argentina ; Dominique DUVAL-DIOP, RAMPAO - West African Network of MPAs ; Lauren WENZEL, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration ; Stacey TIGHE, US Coral Triangle Support Program/CTSP ; Ole VESTERGAARD, UNEP

This workshop will envision ways to expand and strengthen regional network of MPAS by highlighting best practices and addressing some key issues, including: how to promote collaborative planning and governance to enhance a regional vision?  How to engage the different stakeholders (local, national, regional, international), what role each one can play in connecting MPA operating in different contexts? What tools to promote? How to address the issues related to legal framework and what role can Regional Seas and other international conventions play? Those questions will be addressed through case studies from the Coral triangle, North America, the Southwest Atlantic and Antarctic, West Africa and Eastern Tropical Pacific.

This 90 min will seek to promote active interaction among the participants:  short introduction of innovative examples or case studies, directed to answer the key questions, will be followed by panel discussions and exchanges with the public, allowing for further dialogue and mutual learning.

The main expected outcomes of the workshop are an increased awareness of the importance and challenges for strengthening the governance of MPA networks, and the discussion of enabling conditions and recommendations for improving regional initiatives and cooperation.

Objectives of the workshop

Globally, the panel will gather different initiatives led at the sub-regional and regional levels for cross-fertilization and discuss how to take better advantage of those initiatives at the regional level.

More specifically, this workshop will:

  1. Emphasize the importance of sharing experiences and lessons learned on regional MPA networks and their governance,
  2. Promote exchanges on best practices for strengthening regional initiatives and MPA networks
  3. Identify common ground and formulate recommendations for strengthening existing and future regional initiatives

Regional & sub-regional experiences - Panel 3 (WS5D1C)

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM ; LACYDON

Chairpersons: John TANZER, WWF International ; Dixon WARUINGE, UNEP
 
Contributors: Andrea MICHELSON, Fundación Vida Silvestre Argentina ; Amandine EYNAUDI, AAMP ; Barthelemy BATIENO, Partenariat Régional pour la Conservation de la zone côtière et Marine en Afrique de l'Ouest - PRCM ; CPPS CPPS ; Valerie BURGENER, WWF International ; Charlton CLARK, Parks Australia, Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities

Throughout this workshop we aim at producing a joint perspective with the audience on how these regional and sub-regional initiatives or networks can produce common solutions to similar problems in different socio-economic, politic and cultural scenarios.

We also aim at understanding how these regional and sub-regional initiatives and networks could contribute in the next 50-100 years to a better transboundary governance and management of the oceans throughout a holistic and ecosystem-based management approach, taking into account the conservation of biodiversity, the sustained provision of ecosystems services, human wellbeing and sustainable development.

Objectives of the workshop

§  To produce key messages directed to the IMPAC high-level segment participants on the urge to adopt large-scale coordinated measures to improve the conservation status of marine environments and biodiversity.

§  To highlight the relevance and benefits of sub-regional and regional initiatives or networks of MPA for scaling up and strengthening coordinated conservation efforts at local, national and eco-regional level.  

§  To exchange ideas, recommendations and lessons learned with the audience regarding achievements, obstacles and challenges in the implementation of such regional and sub-regional initiatives and networks of MPA, through sharing examples of intra and international cooperation for information sharing, science, capacity building, raising public awareness, policy enhancement, leveraging funding and effective investments.

§  To highlight the importance for livelihoods, food security and local economy of establishing such sub-regional and regional initiatives/networks of MPA taking into account a broader ecosystem-based management approach.

§  To discuss with the audience the role of different stakeholders and sectors (public, private, civil society, donors, etc) in the development of regional and sub-regional initiatives or networks of MPA, and jointly identify key benefits and challenges of multi-stakeholders, inter-institutional and/or transboundary cooperation.

§  To emphasize the contribution of regional/sub-regional initiatives to the harmonization of countries goals towards the achievement of Aichi Target 11. 

Capitalizing skills and tools for effective networks

Time to Get Serious: Designing and Managing MPAs for Human-Wellbeing (KC5E1)

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM ; EUGENIE

Contributors: Linwood PENDLETON, Duke University ; Mahé CHARLES, Agence des aires marines protégées

This knowledge café invites  (co)chairs  from sessions  (both workshops and knowledge cafés) dedicated to socioeconomics issues related to MPAS to debate and formulate precise recommendations for decision makers regarding concrete steps that can be taken to make MPAs more beneficial for people.

Big Ocean Guidelines for the Design and Management of Large Scale MPAs (WS5E2)

11:45 AM - 1:15 PM ; SAINT-JEAN

Chairpersons: Naia LEWIS, Big Ocean
 
Contributors: John PARKS, Big Ocean

The objective of this workshop is to consult with the professional international marine conversation community and invite peer contributions and perspectives on a draft set of proposed guidelines under development regarding the design and management of large-scale MPAs. This interactive workshop will be structured around the review and discussion of draft guidance that has been developed around three components of large-scale MPAs: design, planning, and management.  A set of draft guidelines based on the current global experience and lessons learned from existing large-scale MPA management.  Group review, discussion, and contributions will be faciltated during strcutured plenary sessions. The output of this workshop will contribute to the broader international peer reivew and revision process to finalize these guidelines.

Learning and developing regional training: lessons learned - Part 2 (WS5E1B)

11:45 AM - 1:15 PM ; AMPHITHEATRE AMU

Chairpersons: Giuseppe DI CARLO, WWF Mediterranean ; Georgina BUSTAMANTE, Campam
 
Contributors: Marina GOMEI, WWF Mediterranean ; Roland BALDEO, Fisheries Department ; Marie BONNIN, IRD ; Marie ROMANI, MedPAN

Objective: This session will draw from actions focused on building the capacity of MPA practitioners at the regional level and will identify successful approaches and lessons learned.

Structure: The session will pivot around a series of case studies that will address context, drivers, approaches, institutional settings and results of regional capacity building programs for MPAs and MPA networks. Specifically, the session will include case studies from the Mediterranean, the coral triangle, the eastern tropical pacific and the Caribbean. . Each presentation will focus on a specific aspect (MPA exchanges, ToT/ mentor programs, trainings, skill implementation, networking) of regional capacity building programs, leading to discussion on differences among regions and success/failure encountered. In addition, the socio-political context from each region will be addressed to understand differences and commonalities among capacity building programs across the world, which will help in the sharing of practices and approaches.

 The session will be structured around eight short presentations that will then facilitate and focus the discussion around specific issues including:

$11.       How were capacity building priorities established?

$12.      What were some of the challenges in the delivery of the program?

$13.       How did you structure moving from learning to capacity building?

$14.      Were you able to measure results?

$15.      Were results equitably distributed amongst all MPAs in the network?

$16.      How does the scale and scope of the MPA network correlate to success of the capacity building program?

Discussion groups will then will draw out the lessons learned, challenges and best practices to inform and guide other ongoing and future capacity building programs for MPAs.

Sharing and improving practitioners’ skills - Part 1 (WS5E1A)

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM ; AMPHITHEATRE AMU

Chairpersons: Giuseppe DI CARLO, WWF Mediterranean ; Georgina BUSTAMANTE, Campam
 
Contributors: Marianne LANG, MedPAN ; Marina GOMEI, WWF Mediterranean ; Diana PIETRI, School of Environmental and Forest Sciences, University of Washington ; Souha EL ASMI, RAC/SPA

Objective: This session will draw from actions focused on building the capacity of MPA practitioners at the regional level and will identify successful approaches and lessons learned.

Structure: The session will pivot around a series of case studies that will address context, drivers, approaches, institutional settings and results of regional capacity building programs for MPAs and MPA networks. Specifically, the session will include case studies from the Mediterranean, the coral triangle, the eastern tropical pacific and the Caribbean. . Each presentation will focus on a specific aspect (MPA exchanges, ToT/ mentor programs, trainings, skill implementation, networking) of regional capacity building programs, leading to discussion on differences among regions and success/failure encountered. In addition, the socio-political context from each region will be addressed to understand differences and commonalities among capacity building programs across the world, which will help in the sharing of practices and approaches.

 The session will be structured around eight short presentations that will then facilitate and focus the discussion around specific issues including:

$11.       How were capacity building priorities established?

$12.      What were some of the challenges in the delivery of the program?

$13.       How did you structure moving from learning to capacity building?

$14.      Were you able to measure results?

$15.      Were results equitably distributed amongst all MPAs in the network?

$16.      How does the scale and scope of the MPA network correlate to success of the capacity building program?

Discussion groups will then will draw out the lessons learned, challenges and best practices to inform and guide other ongoing and future capacity building programs for MPAs.

Jointly addressing common pressures and threats

Maritime traffic and conservation (WS5F2)

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM ; NOTRE DAME

Chairpersons: Pascal MAYOL, GIS3M ; Benjamin PONGE, Agence des aires marines protégées ; Stéphane LOUHAUR, Conseil général du Pas-de-Calais
 

How international or cross-border instruments (Particularly Sensitive Sea Areas, European Grouping of Territorial Cooperation…) may help to reduce impacts from maritime traffic?

In order to showcase the issues of governance and stakes involved in the management of environmental impacts of maritime traffic, the implementation feasibility of the International Maritime Organisation’s tools and the alternatives, we will develop three case studies:

$1-          The High Seas: the issue of regulating an area of freedom;

$1-          The European Straits Initiative, a network of local authorities to serve development and marine conservation in straits;

$1-          The PELAGOS marine mammals sanctuary, a practical example of building a PSSA candidature.

More information at:

www.europeanstraits.eu

www.souffleursdecume.com

Shelter from the storm – shaping climate-resilient MPAs (WS5F3)

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM ; JOLIETTE

Chairpersons: Clive DESIRE-TESAR, WWF - Global Arctic Program
 
Contributors: Steven SCHILL, The Nature Conservancy - Caribbean Program ; Heather KOLDEWEY, Global Conservation Programmes - Zoological Society of London ; Yelli DIAWARA, Banc d'Arguin/ Mauritanie ; Martha MCCONNELL, IUCN

This workshop will bring examples from around the globe of how to be ready for an entirely different future. Participants will talk about how their projects are anticipating the change brought by a radically different climate, and encouraging ecological resilience through protection of current and future values. The workshop will explore commonalities and differences in approach from the tropics to the Arctic.

Sustainable Ocean Initiative and regional experiences : Fisheries, from threat to partnership (WS5F1)

11:45 AM - 1:15 PM ; GRAND LARGE

Chairpersons: Charlotte KARIBUHOYE, FIBA ; Jihyun LEE, Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity ; Anne MCDONALD, Sophia University, Japan
 
Contributors: Purificacio CANALS , MedPAN ; Serge Michel GARCIA, IUCN - FEG ; Jessica SANDERS, FAO / Fisheries and Aquaculture Policy and Economics Division ; Abou BAMBA, Abidjan Convention ; Alain JEUDY DE GRISSAC, IUCN Centre for Mediterranean Cooperation ; Hamady DIOP, Commission Sous Regionale des Peches ; Stefan ASMUNDSSON, NEAFC

Sustainable Ocean Initiative (SOI) is being evolved, facilitated and coordinated by the Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity, as a global platform to build partnerships and enhance capacity to achieve the Aichi Biodiversity Targets related to marine and coastal biodiversity in a holistic manner (in particular Targets 6 and 11). This event will provide a forum to present the mission and goals of the Sustainable Ocean Initiative and explore effective modalities for SOI partnership implementation. In particular, the focus will be given on addressing fishing impacts and conservation need in an integrated manner, building upon West African Experiences and others. Suggestions will be made on future scaling-up of SOI implementation.

Objectives of the Workshop:

This event will provide a forum to present the mission and goals of the Sustainable Ocean Initiative and explore effective modalities for SOI partnership implementation. In particular, the focus will be given on addressing fishing impacts and conservation need in an integrated manner, building upon West African Experiences and others. Suggestions will be made on future scaling-up of SOI implementation.

Submit to FacebookSubmit to Google BookmarksSubmit to Twitter